Prescription Medications. Medications that affect hormones, like birth control pills, can help control acne. You might also discuss antibiotic pills and prescription retinoids with your dermatologist. There are also antibiotics that are effective. Doctors may prescribe Aldactone (spironolactone), which was first made to treat high blood pressure, to treat acne. "That works miracles but it can take three months to kick in," Day says. Isotretinoin is another prescription drug for acne, but you can't take it if you're pregnant or planning to get pregnant.
Washing your face with regular soap is not enough to make acne better. The best face wash for acne is effective at removing oil and dirt, but still gentle enough to use regularly without overdrying your skin. Look for topical acne medication ingredients salicylic acid and/or benzoyl peroxide in your face wash and use gentle, nonabrasive cleansing techniques.
If you really must do something about your pimple beyond washing your face and spot treating, ice or a cold compress can help reduce swelling. Wrap an ice cube or the compress in a soft tissue or cloth and apply it to your zit for 20-30 seconds at a time, a few times a day. In case of an emergency (like, prom), you can also see a dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which can help shrink the cyst down quickly in a day or two.

Patients with moderate rosacea may have periodic flares that require treatment with oral antibiotics, lasers, and other therapies. They may require oral antibiotic therapy for years. Some patients complain of looking like they have been drinking alcohol when in fact they don't drink at all. Although rosacea is not a grave medical situation, severe cases may damage some patient's lives. It is important for these patients to express their concerns with their physician and to get professional help in treating their rosacea.


Like microneedling, fractionated skin resurfacing sends skin a signal to respond to damage. Specifically, microscopic columns of injury are created causing minute perforations in the treatment area, while leaving healthy surrounding tissue intact and untouched. "The specific zones of injury trigger the patient's natural neocollagenesis (collagen rebuilding process)," explains Engelman, who characterizes the treatment as both revolutionary and non-invasive. This new collagen rejuvenates the skin and improves its appearance. "Improvements continue over time (up to six months post-procedure) as new collagen continues to rebuild," she says.
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
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