If you're experience hormonal acne every single month—and it's don't-want-to-leave-the-house bad—it's worth visiting your doctor to rule out polycystic ovarian syndrome, a hormonal imbalance that can lead to infertility, anxiety, and depression. Birth control medications, which help regulate hormone levels, are effective in preventing these kinds of breakouts, says Dr. Hale, who's also a fan of DIY remedies when it comes to how to get rid of acne. Home remedies like crushed aspirin application are among her top treatment choices. "You're basically applying pure salicylic acid to it," she explains.
Yet another study took a look at the difference in rates of acne in first-degree relatives between patients and controls. The study used 204 acne patients, and 144 non-acne controls. Their study determined that having a first-degree relative who suffers from acne increases the risk of getting acne by four times. Genes play a role in several ways: firstly, they contribute to skin sensitivity. Acne-prone skin is more susceptible to oil production, and tends to shed and regenerate skin cells faster. Those prone to acne also exhibit strong inflammatory responses to skin irritants and bacteria in comparison to those who don’t have issues with acne.
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Coconut oil is all the rage, with uses ranging from hair conditioning to cooking. But some swear by it as a natural acne treatment. To use coconut oil as an acne treatment, you can include it as part of a healthy diet. The fatty acids like lauric acid caprylic acid are metabolized into antibacterial agents in the body. Or, you can apply a very small amount and rub directly onto your skin after cleansing for an extra hydrating boost.
There are breakouts, and then there are breakouts so bad that make me, a grown woman, literally hide under a blanket. The latter happened over a month ago and, as much as I'm here for the growing skin positivity movement, I have to admit my confidence hit an all-time low. I cancelled plans. I stared unhealthily often at a mirror, examining the damage: a colony of seemingly multiplying cystic zits invaded my chin and jawline like never before. How did I get here?
Genetics can also have an effect on acne breakouts, and may be the reason some people are acne-prone while others are not. One of the top cited studies took a look at 458 pairs of identical twins and 1099 pairs of fraternal twins to study acne prevalence. They found that genes explained a significant 81 percent of the difference in acne prevalence, while the other 19 percent was explained by non-shared environmental factors. 
Who likes scars and that too on the face! Getting rid of acne scars is a little tougher than eliminating acne actually. Pimples can be naturally treated with many ingredients having anti-inflammatory or antibacterial properties which are in abundance in nature. However, pimple scars are a little stubborn as they don’t go easily. However, as the saying goes, nothing is impossible. It may take some time but your regular efforts using certain natural bleaching agents as well as other ingredients may lighten your acne scars and gradually remove them permanently.
If you have scarring, your dermatologist may suggest surgery to help heal acne lesions and remove scarring. A laser can reshape scar tissue and reduce redness. Dermabrasion is a type of surgery that can remove surface scars and reduce the depth of deep scars. Another option is to transfer fat from one part of the body to the face. In some cases, a single treatment can help scarring. But for lasting results, several are often needed. There are also topical treatments for acne scarring.

Acne scars are most often the product of an inflamed lesion, such as a papule, pustule, or cyst. Inflamed blemishes occur when the follicle, or pore, becomes engorged with excess oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria. The pore swells, causing a break in the follicle wall. If the rupture occurs near the skin's surface, the lesion is usually minor and heals quickly. More serious lesions arise when there is a deep break in the follicle wall. The infected material spills out into the dermis and destroys healthy skin tissue.


Smoking, spicy foods, hot drinks, and alcohol may cause flushing and should be avoided. Exposure to sunlight and to extreme hot and cold temperatures should be limited as much as possible. Red wine and chocolate are two well-known rosacea triggers. Some listed foods may have no effect on one patient's rosacea but severely affect someone else. Individual reaction patterns vary greatly in rosacea. Therefore, a food diary may help to elucidate one's special triggers.

Steroid injections: If you feel a stress pimple rearing its ugly head, a steroid shot can be administered the same day you call your derm because the process is very fast. Not only does it immediately reduce the inflammation of an existing zit, but cortisone can also help thick scars (keloids) appear softer and flatter. "These are specifically for raised scars, however," says Dr. Shah. "It'll help flatten out the scar, but it won't do anything to any discrepancies in the texture."
Buying a generic face wash won’t necessarily improve your complexion; for a cleanser to be most effective, you have to pay attention to your skin’s needs and pick the ingredients accordingly. If your skin tends to be oily, choose products with salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, or glycolic acid. For sensitive skin, look for cleansers with lactic acid or hydrating ingredients like glycerin, which aren’t as drying as those made for oilier types.
The best way to fix them: You have a few options with these. The first would be to visit an aesthetician or a dermatologist for a deep-cleaning in a sterile environment. The second? Use an exfoliator. That could be a face scrub, retinol—which boosts skin cell turnover—or even facial cleansing brushes. If you go this route, just pick one. "You just don’t want to combine all them, since that’ll make skin sensitive," adds Dr. Hale.
6. You're a make out bandit and your boyfriend has a beard. Sure, some dudes look hot with a beard (i.e. Ryan Gosling in The Notebook) or even a five o'clock shadow, but your BF's facial hair isn't doing your pretty face any favors when it comes to breakouts. So what gives? Well, as you and your guy hook up, your smooth face rubs against his hairy one, creating friction, which causes his prickly hair to stimulate oil production on your face, causing blemishes and even beard burn. (Tip via Jeanine Downie, M.D., a cosmetic dermatologist and founder of Image Dermatology in Montclair, New Jersey.)
What you can do differently: Gently wash and moisturize your face with a gentle yet effective system (cleanser, toner, moisturizer) that contains pore-clearing ingredients, like alpha hydroxy acids and glycolic and lactic acids. That way you keep the scrubbing to a minimum. Wright recommends Obagi Foaming Gel, Toner and Exfoderm Lotion, her favorite system to suggest for Dangene's acne-prone clients.
Do not—we repeat, do not—even think about attempting to get this out yourself. "With deep zits, there’s no exit strategy, so if you’re pushing on it to try to get rid of it, it could actually leak sebum into the dermis and cause more lesions," explains Dr. Hale. Instead, this is the time to visit your dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which should take care of it in 24 hours. If you're sitting here wondering why doctors don't just shoot all of your zits up with cortisone, that's because that it can actually lead to scarring or even a depression in your skin, especially with smaller zits, says Dr. Chwalek. That's why cortisone shops reserved for the oversize monsters like these.
The spots that linger after a pimple has healed are caused by inflammation that has disrupted the skin's natural healing process. "When your skin is opened up (like when you pop a pimple) and then closes back together, you can get abnormal pigmentation, texture, and tone that looks different from the rest of your skin. Sometimes the broken blood vessels that remain after an acne lesion fades can result in a mark," says Dr. Bowe. For a number of people who are able to refrain from picking, inflamed pimples or blemishes can still leave a dark brown or red mark — but these naturally fade over the course of a few months, notes dermatologist Heather C. Woolery-Lloyd, MD.
A healthy diet can only prevent 90% of your acne. The other 10% of your acne has to do with external factors. External factors are cleanser, cream, lotion and moisturizer that you apply to your face. During the course of my acne treatment with my doctor, 4 main ingredients appeared on all my topical prescriptions. You should look for these ingredients in your external acne treatment products. They are as follows:

A benzoyl peroxide cream (2.5 percent strength) is a good choice for adolescents experiencing red or inflamed breakouts that aren't getting better with medicated cleansers. Benzoyl peroxide is a very common and inexpensive acne treatment cream that can be found over-the-counter in the skin care aisle. Benzoyl peroxide kills the bacteria that cause pimples and is highly successful in treating mild cases of acne.


Sometimes even though they wash properly and try lotions and oil-free makeup, people get acne anyway — and this is totally normal. In fact, some girls who normally have a handle on their acne may find that it comes out a few days before they get their period. This is called premenstrual acne, and about 7 out of 10 women get it from changes in hormones in the body.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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