If you have oily or combination skin and are prone to breakouts, you should be using skin-care products labeled "oil-free," "non-comedogenic," or "water-based," Dr. Schultz says. Just one of these will ensure that the lotion you're slathering on isn't going to clog your pores and make matters worse. Try a gel-based moisturizer like Belif The True Cream Aqua Bomb; for an SPF option, we like PCA Skin Weightless Protection Broad Spectrum SPF.


Similar to the lingering emotions you experience after an intense Riverdale episode, acne scars are basically the long-lasting aftereffects of your short-lived breakouts. An unexpected pimple (or five) is annoying enough, but the acne scars and dark marks it leaves behind are often worse. While there isn't a magic wand that can get rid of them overnight, top dermatologists from across the country share how to handle marks and bumps, from prevention to treatment.


26. Get your SPF on. Sunscreen isn't just for summer—your skin needs protection every day, even in winter. There are now sunscreens for every skin type imaginable—even ones that help make your skin less oily, so your face stays matte and pimple-free! Look for a daily moisturizer with SPF that says it's "lightweight," "oil-free," or "oil-controlling." For the highest level, look for a PA++ rating, it covers both UVA and UVB rays, so you're guarded against everything from burns to future wrinkles!

In unusual cases, a skin biopsy may be required to help confirm the diagnosis of rosacea. Occasionally, a dermatologist may perform a noninvasive test called a skin scraping in the office to help exclude a skin mite infestation by Demodex, which can look just like rosacea (and may be a triggering factor). A skin culture can help exclude other causes of facial skin bumps like staph infections or herpes infections. Blood tests are not generally required but may help exclude less common causes of facial blushing and flushing, including systemic lupus, other autoimmune conditions, carcinoid, and dermatomyositis.

Topical treatments on their own may not be enough to give you clear skin, especially in those with complicated, inflammatory cystic acne. There are several acne medication options approved for use by the FDA, but which one is best for you is a question for your dermatologist and/or general practitioner. Baldwin says if you have insurance and you have acne, a prescription may be the best step because "it makes no sense to try to handle the condition yourself or to use over the counter products that are always less effective than prescriptions meds." Here are a few of the acne medications you'll want to ask about:
Spot treatments are key for treating a pimple ASAP. Benzoyl peroxide is often vilified for being harsh, but when it comes to really zapping a zit, it should be your best friend. Just dab it on the trouble spot to dry it out and kill bacteria. For heavy-duty action, try Neutrogena Rapid Clear Stubborn Acne Spot Gel; for something gentler, we like Arithmetic Acne Control Complex, which has soothing ingredients to counter the drying effects and is made with adult skin in mind.

When it comes to scarring, many doctors will tell you that prevention is key. Wearing sunscreen daily is critical, says Heidi Waldorf, a New York City-based dermatologist, and this one from Elta MD is her favorite. "It contains niacinamide, which reduces inflammation, and it's oil-free, which makes it excellent for daily use for acne-prone patients," she says.
Bacteria. Excess sebum clogs the openings to hair follicles -- especially those on the face, neck, chest, and back. Bacteria grow in these clogged follicles. This makes blackheads or whiteheads, also known as ''comedones,'' form on the skin's surface. Sometimes, this clogging causes the follicle wall to break under the pressure of this buildup. When this happens, sebum leaks into nearby tissues and forms a pustule or a papule -- this is called inflammatory acne. Larger, tender pustules are called nodules.

In order to treat acne marks and scars, it's helpful to learn how to distinguish between the two. "What many people don’t realize is that a dark or pink mark on the skin is not actually an acne scar. Inflammation in the skin often leaves behind a stain as part of the natural healing process. The inflammation revs up pigment production, creating the mark that fades on its own over several weeks to months," says dermatologist and 2018 Acne Awards judge Dr. Joshua Zeichner. Unlike scars, these are smooth to the touch (AKA, not raised or indented), and signify that there is no permanent collagen damage to the skin.


Isotretinoin has a high risk of inducing birth defects if taken by pregnant women. Women of childbearing age who take isotretinoin need two negative pregnancy tests (blood or urine) before starting the drug, monthly tests while they take it, and another after they are done. Those who are sexually active must use two forms of contraception, one of which is usually the oral contraceptive pill. Isotretinoin leaves the body completely when treatment is done; women must be sure to avoid pregnancy for one month after therapy is stopped. There is, however, no risk to childbearing after that time.
Bellafill is a dermal filler approved for the correction of moderate to severe, atrophic, distensible facial acne scars on the cheeks in patients over the age of 21. This injection provides immediate improvement — like, your skin is improved by the time you leave the office. Once it's injected, the collagen goes to work immediately, adding natural-looking volume and lift to soften acne scars. Over time, your body naturally metabolizes the collagen — but the results remain intact. In fact, Z. Paul Lorenc, a New York City-based plastic surgeon, explains, “90 percent of patients who used Bellafill to treat their acne scars were still satisfied with the results at the one-year mark." The best part? There is no downtime and you can return to normal activities right away.
According to dermatologist Dr. Whitney Bowe, some scars are thick, raised hypertrophic scars that stick out above the skin; others are keloid, which are scars that have over-healed, and manifest as dense, rubbery skin tissue. Then, there are atrophic scars that appear as depressions in the skin — they're the most challenging to treat. The three main categories of atrophic scars are:
Chemical peels: "A chemical peel is a treatment that uses the application of mild solutions for skin refinement and regeneration. Products containing glycolic acid promote cell turnover, which is the process where new skin cells form and help even out your skin tone," says Dr. Bowe. You can try an at-home peel like Peter Thomas Roth 40% Triple Acid Peel, which uses both glycolic and salicylic acids to help fade spots by exfoliating dead skin cells and smoothing out skin texture. "Or, your dermatologist can prescribe you a stronger peel based on your skin type and treatment goals," says Dr. Bowe.
Like microneedling, fractionated skin resurfacing sends skin a signal to respond to damage. Specifically, microscopic columns of injury are created causing minute perforations in the treatment area, while leaving healthy surrounding tissue intact and untouched. "The specific zones of injury trigger the patient's natural neocollagenesis (collagen rebuilding process)," explains Engelman, who characterizes the treatment as both revolutionary and non-invasive. This new collagen rejuvenates the skin and improves its appearance. "Improvements continue over time (up to six months post-procedure) as new collagen continues to rebuild," she says.

When you have true scars that have changed the texture of your skin, you’ll need a medical procedure to see improvement. We use a laser specifically approved by the FDA for treating laser scars. Some people try chemical peels, which aren’t very effective. Others try dermabrasion, a technique like a sanding wheel on your skin, but there’s a high risk of permanent scarring. A laser gets much better results without the same risk.

Toning. After you wash and exfoliate you should apply a toner to the face that will help tighten the pores so oil and dirt cannot become trapped and create a home for harmful bacteria. Toners designed for acne sufferers are readily available at drugstores, but you can also apply products like apple cider vinegar or witch hazel. Apply toners with cotton balls and allow them to sit on the skin rather than rinsing them away.
We use cookies and similar technologies to improve your browsing experience, personalize content and offers, show targeted ads, analyze traffic, and better understand you. We may share your information with third-party partners for marketing purposes. To learn more and make choices about data use, visit our Advertising Policy and Privacy Policy. By clicking “Accept and Continue” below, (1) you consent to these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form, and (2) you consent to allow your data to be transferred, processed, and stored in the United States.
Laser resurfacing. This procedure can be done in the doctor's or dermatologist's office. The laser removes the damaged top layer of skin and tightens the middle layer, leaving skin smoother. It can take anywhere from a few minutes to an hour. The doctor will try to lessen any pain by first numbing the skin with local anesthesia. It usually takes between 3 and 10 days for the skin to heal completely.

Aqua (Water, Eau), Glycerin, Triethanolamine, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Propylene Glycol, Isopropyl Alcohol, Salicylic Acid, Dimethicone, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Thymus Vulgaris (Thyme) Leaf Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate, Carbomer, Parfum (Fragrance), Diazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Benzyl Benzoate, Benzyl Salicylate, Eugenol, Linalool.
You’ll also learn how to prepare for your treatment. We’ll give you products to apply before your procedure to prime your skin and avoid pigmentation. You’ll also receive information on pain medication and the downtime you’ll need as you recover. If you decide to take time off work, you can schedule your procedures before a weekend or take a few days off.
Over-the-Counter Creams and Lotions. Retinoid creams or lotions can help clear your skin and also lessen wrinkles. Products made with sulfur can be good for the occasional spot treatment. Benzoyl peroxide is another acne fighter. Use benzoyl peroxide products only occasionally, because they can dry out your skin, Day says. You could also try a milder benzoyl peroxide product.
Sometimes, your gynecologist can share insight into your acne, especially when it comes to deciding if birth control could help your breakouts. The FDA approves of Estrostep, Ortho Tri-Cyclen and Yaz to combat acne, but the trick is to be patient, as it can take up to four months to start seeing results. "This plan of attack works best when paired with whatever topical treatments you’re already using to treat your acne, like Proactiv, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, etc," advises dermatologist Dr. Elizabeth Tanzi.
Rosacea is considered an incurable auto-inflammatory skin condition that waxes and wanes. As opposed to traditional or teenage acne, most adult patients do not "outgrow" rosacea. Rosacea characteristically involves the central region of the face, mainly the forehead, cheeks, chin, and the lower half of the nose. It commonly appears in people with light skin and particularly in those of English, Irish, and Scottish backgrounds. Some famous people with rosacea include the former U.S. President Bill Clinton and W.C. Fields. Alcohol intake does not directly cause rosacea, but it can be aggravated by it. Rosacea is not contagious or infectious.
This potent serum uses a blend of restorative, antioxidant ingredients to promote skin healing, which is what acne scars need. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a time-released acid that simultaneously stimulates collagen synthesis and promotes wound healing. Retinol works similarly in this formulation, while zinc sulfate is as an anti-inflammatory, and aurbtin helps manage hyperpigmentation.

Do not—we repeat, do not—even think about attempting to get this out yourself. "With deep zits, there’s no exit strategy, so if you’re pushing on it to try to get rid of it, it could actually leak sebum into the dermis and cause more lesions," explains Dr. Hale. Instead, this is the time to visit your dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which should take care of it in 24 hours. If you're sitting here wondering why doctors don't just shoot all of your zits up with cortisone, that's because that it can actually lead to scarring or even a depression in your skin, especially with smaller zits, says Dr. Chwalek. That's why cortisone shops reserved for the oversize monsters like these.
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
×