To get rid of acne, wash your face with a pH balanced cleanser twice a day to eliminate acne-causing bacteria. You should also exfoliate your face at least once a week with a physical or chemical exfoliant which will remove dead skin cells that clog pores. Applying a benzoyl peroxide cream to your acne before you go to bed can also help get rid of breakouts.
Sunscreen: "Sun exposure during an active breakout can lead to darkening of inflammatory lesions, prolonging their appearance on your skin and making them harder to fade over time," says Dr. Shereene Idriss from Union Square Dermatology, which means it's important to lather on the sunscreen daily — even when it's cloudy. And don't worry about breaking out from a pore-clogging sunscreen; the latest formulas are more innovative and acne-friendly than ever. Elta MD UV Clear Broad-Spectrum SPF 46 is a top derm-approved favorite. It contains niacinamide, which is an anti-inflammatory that helps reduce redness.
If you have scarring, your dermatologist may suggest surgery to help heal acne lesions and remove scarring. A laser can reshape scar tissue and reduce redness. Dermabrasion is a type of surgery that can remove surface scars and reduce the depth of deep scars. Another option is to transfer fat from one part of the body to the face. In some cases, a single treatment can help scarring. But for lasting results, several are often needed. There are also topical treatments for acne scarring.
Best used for treating hyperpigmentation, these products — packed with glycolic acid — promote cellular turnover to remove the top layers of the skin revealing a brighter, fresh complexion, says New York City-based dermatologist Dendy Engelman. "Glycolic acid is the smallest acid in size," she says. (This means it can get deep into the skin.) "It is very effective in breaking down skin cells and removing dead particles," says Engleman. "It boosts collagen production and elastin production with the removal of waste and dead skin cells." Bottom line: By removing these dead cells, healthy, glow-y skin is revealed.

Like acne on your face, back acne occurs when your pores become blocked with oil and dead skin cells.. Exfoliating your back regularly might help remove these dead skin cells and pore-clogging debris before they have a chance to block pores. However, you want to take care not to scrub too hard, especially if you are experiencing an active breakout. Use a soft cloth to gently brush away surface impurities as you shower.

Comedo (whiteheads or blackheads) or papules. The comedo is the basic acne lesion, which is a plugged pore. If the plugged pore stays under the skin, it's called a closed comedo and forms a white bump or whitehead. Blackheads are comedos that open up and appear blackish on the surface of the skin. This black color is not due to dirt, but because the air reacts with the excess oil.

Those who consume a bevy of seafood, seaweed, and iodized salt experience high iodine levels. These iodine levels have also been purported to trigger acne flare ups. Word spread about iodine’s potential for causing skin issues in the 1960s, and it’s had a bad rap ever since. However, recent studies have fought against this pervasive thought, as some studies have seen no difference between acne in those who were given iodine and those who weren’t. It’s important to take these studies with a grain of salt, and understand that depleting your diet of iodine can have negative effects on holistic health. Iodine is essential for proper thyroid function, and is responsible for the manufacture of T3 and T4 thyroid hormones and it’s important to maintain proper levels of iodine in your diet.
8. You can't stop picking at your pimples. It's tempting in the moment, but it's never a good idea to play dermatologist, because it's impossible to pick your own pimple and not make a red mark that could turn into a scar. Even worse, when you try to press the plug or oil or puss out of your pore, you run the risk of pushing the bacteria deeper or spreading it around underneath your skin, multiplying your pimples.
Apple cider vinegar has many properties. It is an astringent and a natural disinfectant that makes it a good natural antiseptic. It also balances the pH level of your body and of your skin when applied topically. And because it is anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory, it is effective in the treatment of acne too. All of these properties of apple cider vinegar are granted by its beneficial components that include vitamins, minerals, carbolic acid, ketones, aldehydes, amino acids, anti-oxidant, acetic acid and many more. It is therefore a known remedy for acne. You can also heal acne scars considerably with apple cider vinegar. As this vinegar scrapes off the dead skin cells, it may fade away the acne scars to a great extent. You can either use apple cider vinegar with water or with honey.
Chemical peels: "A chemical peel is a treatment that uses the application of mild solutions for skin refinement and regeneration. Products containing glycolic acid promote cell turnover, which is the process where new skin cells form and help even out your skin tone," says Dr. Bowe. You can try an at-home peel like Peter Thomas Roth 40% Triple Acid Peel, which uses both glycolic and salicylic acids to help fade spots by exfoliating dead skin cells and smoothing out skin texture. "Or, your dermatologist can prescribe you a stronger peel based on your skin type and treatment goals," says Dr. Bowe.

There you have it! As with any skin condition, it's best to consult your regular dermatologist to see which option is best for you. And while technology has come a long way in making dark marks and acne scars treatable, remember that most of us will experience them at some point. So while these are all feasible options for fading your acne scars, don't forget that you always have the choice of pimple positivity, too.


So if popping pimples doesn't cause scarring, what does? Long-lasting scars typically turn up after a recurring bout with cystic acne. Cystic acne is a breakout that burrows deep into the skin. These red, painful nodules occur when clogged pores are filled with pus and bacteria, which causes inflammation. Cystic breakouts are often tied to an internal fluctuation of hormones like testosterone (that's why they're common during puberty, monthly menstruation, and perimenopause). "If there is a cyst in the skin, it's going to cause a scar the longer it sits there because pus or bacteria deeper inside the pores cause surrounding inflammation," says Dr. Karolak. And as a result, the inflammation affects the collagen production as well as the fat stores under the skin, creating a visible scar on the surface.


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Since there is some overlap between acne and rosacea, some of the medications may be similar. Acne and rosacea have in common several possible treatments, including (but not limited to) oral antibiotics, topical antibiotics, sulfa-based face washes, isotretinoin, and many others. It is important to seek a physician's advice before using random over-the-counter acne medications since they can actually irritate skin that is prone to rosacea. Overall, rosacea skin tends to be more sensitive and easily irritated than that of common acne.
I couldn't just let the worst breakout ever live on without a visit to the dermatologist, so I went to BeautyRx founder Dr. Neal Schultz. He gave me this incredible "Z Stick" spot treatment that contains mild cortisone (the same substance derms use to inject pimples to make them die down in 24 to 48 hours), and Clindamycin, an antibiotic. I applied this every morning and evening to all my spots and it acted like an extra layer of armor against further inflammation. Sadly, it's prescription-only and/or only available through Dr. Schultz's practice in New York—but he's working on making one for consumers.
People who escaped their teen years almost pimple-free may develop persistent adult-onset acne as they get older. Despite the normal increase in androgen levels during puberty, some doctors believe that flare-ups of acne have less to do with androgen levels than with how a person's skin responds to an increase in sebum production or to the bacteria that causes acne. The bacteria Propionibacterium acnes occurs naturally in healthy hair follicles. If too many of them accumulate in plugged follicles, they may secrete enzymes that break down sebum and cause inflammation. Some people are simply more sensitive than others to this reaction. Sebum levels that might cause a pimple or two in one person may result in widespread outbreaks -- or even acute cystic acne -- in another person.

For many women, acne can be an upsetting illness. Women may have feelings of depression, poor body image, or low self-esteem. But you don't have to wait to outgrow acne or to let it run its course. Today, almost every case of acne can be resolved. Acne also can, sometimes, be prevented. Talk with your doctor or dermatologist (a doctor who specializes in treating skin problems) about how you can help prevent acne and if treatment would help you.
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
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