Those who consume a bevy of seafood, seaweed, and iodized salt experience high iodine levels. These iodine levels have also been purported to trigger acne flare ups. Word spread about iodine’s potential for causing skin issues in the 1960s, and it’s had a bad rap ever since. However, recent studies have fought against this pervasive thought, as some studies have seen no difference between acne in those who were given iodine and those who weren’t. It’s important to take these studies with a grain of salt, and understand that depleting your diet of iodine can have negative effects on holistic health. Iodine is essential for proper thyroid function, and is responsible for the manufacture of T3 and T4 thyroid hormones and it’s important to maintain proper levels of iodine in your diet.
When you get acne, there is intense inflammation of your facial skin and there is a loss of collagen. Collagen is the protein fiber, one of the components of skin which gives skin its elasticity. When you pick or squeeze your pimples, it leads to further inflammation and injury to your skin. It also leads the bacteria and pus in your pimple go deep down into your skin resulting in more loss of collagen which means even deeper scars on your face.
Acne scars are most often the product of an inflamed lesion, such as a papule, pustule, or cyst. Inflamed blemishes occur when the follicle, or pore, becomes engorged with excess oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria. The pore swells, causing a break in the follicle wall. If the rupture occurs near the skin's surface, the lesion is usually minor and heals quickly. More serious lesions arise when there is a deep break in the follicle wall. The infected material spills out into the dermis and destroys healthy skin tissue.
In unusual cases, a skin biopsy may be required to help confirm the diagnosis of rosacea. Occasionally, a dermatologist may perform a noninvasive test called a skin scraping in the office to help exclude a skin mite infestation by Demodex, which can look just like rosacea (and may be a triggering factor). A skin culture can help exclude other causes of facial skin bumps like staph infections or herpes infections. Blood tests are not generally required but may help exclude less common causes of facial blushing and flushing, including systemic lupus, other autoimmune conditions, carcinoid, and dermatomyositis.

Experiment with aloe vera. The sap of the aloe vera plant is a soothing natural substance which can be used to relieve many ailments, from burns to wounds to acne scars. Aloe vera helps to rejuvenate and moisturize the skin, encouraging acne scars to fade. It is possible to buy aloe vera products in the drugstore, but the best thing to do is buy an aloe vera plant and use the sap from a broken leaf. This gel-like sap can be applied directly on the scarring, and there is no need to wash off.


Scars are varied and complex, and learning how to get rid of acne marks requires trial and error. There are a variety of ways to get rid of acne scars and each corner has a different proponent. However, before you go jumping on the bandwagon for the latest cure-all, we suggest breaking down the various treatments methods into their disparate parts.
So if popping pimples doesn't cause scarring, what does? Long-lasting scars typically turn up after a recurring bout with cystic acne. Cystic acne is a breakout that burrows deep into the skin. These red, painful nodules occur when clogged pores are filled with pus and bacteria, which causes inflammation. Cystic breakouts are often tied to an internal fluctuation of hormones like testosterone (that's why they're common during puberty, monthly menstruation, and perimenopause). "If there is a cyst in the skin, it's going to cause a scar the longer it sits there because pus or bacteria deeper inside the pores cause surrounding inflammation," says Dr. Karolak. And as a result, the inflammation affects the collagen production as well as the fat stores under the skin, creating a visible scar on the surface.
Rosacea is considered an incurable auto-inflammatory skin condition that waxes and wanes. As opposed to traditional or teenage acne, most adult patients do not "outgrow" rosacea. Rosacea characteristically involves the central region of the face, mainly the forehead, cheeks, chin, and the lower half of the nose. It commonly appears in people with light skin and particularly in those of English, Irish, and Scottish backgrounds. Some famous people with rosacea include the former U.S. President Bill Clinton and W.C. Fields. Alcohol intake does not directly cause rosacea, but it can be aggravated by it. Rosacea is not contagious or infectious.
Make sandalwood paste. Sandalwood is known for its skin healing properties, and is easy to prepare at home. Just mix one tablespoon of sandalwood powder with a few drops of rosewater or milk to form a paste. Apply this paste to the affected area and leave it on for at least 30 minutes before rinsing. Repeat this process daily until your scars have vanished.
If you have scarring, your dermatologist may suggest surgery to help heal acne lesions and remove scarring. A laser can reshape scar tissue and reduce redness. Dermabrasion is a type of surgery that can remove surface scars and reduce the depth of deep scars. Another option is to transfer fat from one part of the body to the face. In some cases, a single treatment can help scarring. But for lasting results, several are often needed. There are also topical treatments for acne scarring.
Eat healthily. Foods that are highly processed and contain a lot of oils greatly increase the amount of acne on your body. Getting the proper amount of nutrients from whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and protein help your skin to regenerate faster and limit unnecessary oil production. When at all possible, avoid foods that are processed or contain a lot of sugar (think junk foods).[11]
Breakouts can come and go, but the scars they leave behind can linger for years (or more). You've probably been told, "Don't pop your pimples, or you'll end up with a mark." But recently, I learned that the most common acne scars have nothing to do with your tendency to squeeze zits. "Popping pimples doesn't cause scarring," Mark Karolak, D.O., a board-certified facial plastic surgeon at Reflections Center for Skin and Body, tells SELF. "If it's just a whitehead and blackhead on the surface, it can be popped without creating any scarring."
What you can do differently: Instead of dousing your zit with a spot treatment, apply a dab of OTC 1 percent hydrocortisone cream, like Aveeno One Percent Hydrocortisone Anti-Itch Cream, onto the spot two to three times during the day to take down the inflammation and redness. Then conceal it by simply covering it up with a concealer, like Clinique Even Better Compact Makeup, which has antibacterial ingredients to keep the formula bacteria-free and your face clear.
No one factor causes acne. Acne occurs when sebaceous (oil) glands attached to the hair follicles are stimulated at the time of puberty or due to other hormonal changes. Sebum (oil) is a natural substance that lubricates and protects the skin. Associated with increased oil production is a change in the manner in which the skin cells mature, predisposing them to plug the follicular pore. The plug can appear as a whitehead if it is covered by a thin layer of skin, or if exposed to the air, the darker exposed portion of the plug is called a "blackhead." The plugged hair follicle gradually enlarges, producing a bump. As the follicle enlarges, the wall may rupture, allowing irritating substances and normal skin bacteria access into the deeper layers of the skin, ultimately producing inflammation. Inflammation near the skin's surface produces a pustule; deeper inflammation results in a papule (pimple); if the inflammation is deeper still, it forms a cyst.
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