Use retinoid skin products. Retinoids are vitamin A derivatives which are used in a wide array of skin care products treating fine lines and wrinkles, skin discoloration, and acne. Retinoids boost collagen production and speed up cell turnover, making them a great choice for targeting acne scars. These creams can be a little on the pricey side, but they are highly recommended by dermatologists for their fast, effective results.
When it comes to skin care, we're not usually ones for hard and fast rules. Everyone has unique skin types, skin tones, lifestyles, and genetic histories that make it impossible to have a single piece of one-size-fits-all advice. It can take years — and dozens of trips to the dermatologist — to discover how to treat acne effectively on your unique skin. But here at Teen Vogue, we've pretty much made it our life mission to figure out the best tips from the pros to point you in the right direction. They've seen it all and won't recommend it unless it's backed up by experience and science,.

Clear, perfect, glowy skin is pretty much a magical unicorn we’ve been chasing since we hit puberty. We love to believe it exists, but for most of us it’s a myth that only exists in fairy tales. And, honestly, the internet doesn’t help much. There are so many supposedly “natural” DIYs floating around the World Wide Web, it’s hard to tell what treatments and tips are real—and what’s a bunch of BS.


Many over-the-counter lotions and creams containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide are available to help prevent acne and clear it up at the same time. You can experiment with these to see which helps. Be sure to follow the instructions exactly — don't use more than you're supposed to at one time (your skin may get too dried out and feel and look worse) and follow any label directions about allergy testing.


This might annoy your mom, but using your fingers to chat could save your skin. Just think of all those oils, all that bacteria and all those germs on your iPhone. When you hold it up to your face, it’s a little like rubbing your cheek on a New York City sidewalk. {Shudder.} When you need to talk, wipe your phone with a cleansing wipe or go hands-free.
Rosacea is a common skin problem often called "adult acne." Faired skinned and menopausal women are more likely to have rosacea. Rosacea also seems to run in families. It causes redness in the center parts of the face and pimples. Blood vessels under the skin of the face may enlarge and show through the skin as small red lines. The skin may be swollen and feel warm.
lThis at-home skin peel available at Sephora tightens pores, reduces oil, helps retexturize skin and diminishes dark spots. It's paraben and sulfate free, non-comedogenic, and is not tested on animals. Use this peel each week as part of your clear skin regimen to help even out skin tone and gently remove unhealthy top skin layers, revealing new, healthier skin underneath.
Español: no tener acné, Italiano: Liberare il Viso dall'Acne, Deutsch: Ein aknefreies Gesicht bekommen, Português: Ter um Rosto Sem Acne, Nederlands: Zorgen dat je geen acne in je gezicht meer hebt, Français: avoir un visage sans acné, Русский: избавиться от прыщей, 中文: 拥有没有粉刺的脸, Čeština: Jak mít obličej bez akné, Bahasa Indonesia: Memiliki Wajah Bebas Jerawat, हिन्दी: मुहाँसों (Acne) से मुक्ति पायें, ไทย: มีหน้าใสไร้สิว, Tiếng Việt: Có một Gương mặt Sạch Mụn, 한국어: 여드름 없는 얼굴 만드는 법, العربية: الحصول على وجه خالي من حبوب الشباب
The bad news: There's no secret ingredient or miracle gadget that makes scars totally disappear. Don't get discouraged, though. A lot of what you think is acne scarring is really just hyperpigmentation or erythema (brown or red spots) rather than an actual change in the texture of the skin. Plus, there's a bevy of gels, creams, and treatments that can bring that discoloration down. We asked top dermatologists to recommend the most effective of the bunch.
The inflammation caused by your breakout can cause more than just the pimple you see on the surface, it can also cause damage below the skin. "The inflammatory response produces a loss in collagen and the overlying skin will collapse and leave a depression," Howard Sobel, M.D., a NYC dermatologist and founder of DDF Skincare, tells SELF. To get rid of these tiny pockmarks, Dr. Karolak relies on a TCA Cross chemical peel. TCA stands for trichloroacetic acid. "We use a little applicator and go into the hole with chemicals to cause a burn. That causes the wall of that ice pick to heal itself and close in on itself," explains Dr. Karolak.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
"I often recommend PCA Skin Pigment Gel to patients looking to treat scars left behind from acne," explains Rebecca Kazin, a dermatologist at Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and Johns Hopkins department of dermatology. "This gel contains 2 percent hydroquinone blended with other skin brighteners, like kojic acid, resorcinol, and azeleic acid, which work to lighten the pigmentation without irritating the skin," she says. The addition of lactic acid helps maintain moisture to prevent overdrying, which can worsen pigmentation.
Wrap your index finger with cotton, and gently start removing black heads and white heads starting from one side of the face until the skin is clean. For stubborn black heads and white heads, make sure you hold the skin tight with the left hand while using a lancet in the right hand to gently poke the blemish. Using the lancet will make it easier for the white head to come out without bruising the skin; especially with a product like BD Ultrafine. This takes about 10-20 minutes depending on the severity of the acne.
If saving babysitting money for a year still won't make a dent in the funds you need to get a fancy laser treatment that will blast away acne scars, don't be discouraged. Thanks to the geniuses behind drugstore brands like La Roche-Posay, there's a new class of products that feature smart technology and better-than-ever ingredients to help treat dark marks and acne scars — at an affordable price. “La-Roche Posay’s Pigmentclar line is unique in the way it combines exfoliating lipohydroxy acid (LHA), phe-resorcinol, and ferulic acid, which are both strong brightening ingredients, all together to form a topical product that’s seriously effective," says dermatologist Dr. Mona Gohara.
Acne scars take many different forms. You might see tiny pockmarks, a swollen keloid, or a discolored area on the skin. And just like the types of scars vary, there isn't a one-size-fits-all fix. Your dermatologist can use a combination of treatments including lasers, chemical peels, or fillers to minimize the spots. "Once there is scarring you can't get the skin back to the way it was before," says Dr. Karolak. "But we can get it to look significantly better, so that [clients] feel more comfortable in social environments."
There are breakouts, and then there are breakouts so bad that make me, a grown woman, literally hide under a blanket. The latter happened over a month ago and, as much as I'm here for the growing skin positivity movement, I have to admit my confidence hit an all-time low. I cancelled plans. I stared unhealthily often at a mirror, examining the damage: a colony of seemingly multiplying cystic zits invaded my chin and jawline like never before. How did I get here?
Moderation and regularity are good things, but not everyone can sleep eight hours, eat three healthy meals per day, and drink plenty of water a day. Probably the most useful lifestyle changes one can make is to never to pick or squeeze pimples. Playing with or popping pimples, no matter how careful and clean one is, nearly always makes bumps stay redder and bumpier longer. People often refer to redness as "scarring," but fortunately, it usually isn't permanent. It's just a mark that takes months to fade if left entirely alone.
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