11. You're wearing a lot of hats or constantly touching your face. Anything that can trap sweat and bacteria against your skin and clog your pores, like the lining of a tight hat, can cause zits to crop up. Also, touching your face or resting your chin in your hand while you're sitting at your desk can transfer bacteria from your hand onto your face and brew blemishes. (Tip via Dr. Downie.)
Some individuals have absolutely no symptoms, and rosacea doesn't bother them. They may enjoy perfectly healthy normal lives without any effect from this benign skin condition. Some patients really like the pink glow to their cheeks and find it gives them a pleasant color without having to use blush. They may not even know they have rosacea. They usually do not want to use any treatment.
Common knowledge would dictate that most people are aware that certain foods, and in turn, the nutrients they contain, can be beneficial for specific body parts. For example, healthy bones require calcium and vitamin D; our hearts function better when we eat certain seafood that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. However, this does beg the question as to what food promotes healthy skin?
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
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