Doctors can treat telangiectasias with a small electric needle, a laser, intense pulsed light, or minor surgery to close off the dilated blood vessels. Usually, multiple treatments are required for best results, and only a portion of the blood vessels improve with each treatment. Not everyone responds the same to these types of treatments, and a physician can help someone decide which treatment is best for his or her skin type, condition, and size of blood vessels.
As mentioned above, genetics are thought to play a major role in your susceptibility to acne. However, using the best acne products and taking good care of your skin can help you prevent worsening acne and scars later in life. Check out these other known acne causes and aggravators and see how to prevent acne by cutting some of these out of your life:
When you get acne, there is intense inflammation of your facial skin and there is a loss of collagen. Collagen is the protein fiber, one of the components of skin which gives skin its elasticity. When you pick or squeeze your pimples, it leads to further inflammation and injury to your skin. It also leads the bacteria and pus in your pimple go deep down into your skin resulting in more loss of collagen which means even deeper scars on your face.
Your body is capable of taking care of your scars and they will get lighter with time. However, if you expose them to the sun, their healing process will slow down and the scars will get darker. So, avoid the sun. If it’s essential to go out in sun, use sunscreen to guard your skin and also cover yourself with hat, umbrella, clothes- whatever you can lay hands on.
When it comes to acne scars — especially difficult to treat indented or raised ones — the best offense is a good defense. If you’re still struggling with active acne and want to avoid future scarring, Avram likes this drugstore-staple Neutrogena wash because it contains salicylic acid, a beta-hydroxy acid that he says “exfoliates the skin, softens the appearance of the acne itself, and has some antibacterial properties.”
You can help keep rosacea under control by keeping a record of things that cause it to flare up. Try to avoid or limit these triggers as much as you can. Antibiotic lotions or gels can also help. Sometimes, you may need to take antibiotic pills. Your dermatologist may treat you with laser surgery. If you think you have rosacea, talk with your doctor about these treatments.
Do not—we repeat, do not—even think about attempting to get this out yourself. "With deep zits, there’s no exit strategy, so if you’re pushing on it to try to get rid of it, it could actually leak sebum into the dermis and cause more lesions," explains Dr. Hale. Instead, this is the time to visit your dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which should take care of it in 24 hours. If you're sitting here wondering why doctors don't just shoot all of your zits up with cortisone, that's because that it can actually lead to scarring or even a depression in your skin, especially with smaller zits, says Dr. Chwalek. That's why cortisone shops reserved for the oversize monsters like these.

Get at least eight hours of sleep. Sleeping kills two birds with one stone, as it helps to relax your body as well as detoxify it. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, chances are your skin hasn’t had the time or ability to renew its skin cells. Regulate your sleep cycle by going to bed at a consistent time every night and sleeping for a minimum of eight hours at least.[12]
There is also a role for Bellafill and other injectable fillers, including fat, for some depressed scars. Bellafill is currently the only filler that’s approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help raise depressed scars. It packs a one-two punch by adding volume, and also encouraging collagen formation beneath the surface by creating a supportive scaffold. “Bellafill and other injectables can fill in scars but these tend to be better for one scar,” adds New York City facial plastic surgeon Jennifer Levine, MD. Filler results can last up to 18 months. “If you have a cheek full of depressed scars, it’s better to resurface the face with laser, radiofrequency, or another energy-based treatment,” she adds.
You’re a typical hormonal-acne patient if, well past puberty, you’re breaking out around your period, usually in the jawline area, says Anolik. A consistent routine is key—as is enduring a waiting period of two to three months for said routine to work, he continues: “Even powerful prescription treatments can take a few months to really clear things up, and that’s our biggest challenge. People who get frustrated and don’t stick to their treatments get stuck in a cycle of trying and quitting too early, and feeling like nothing works.”

You can apply all the topicals you want, but unfortunately, most treatments you'll find at the drugstore won't help with acne scars, Hellman says. However, she notes that derma rollers (at-home microneedling devices) may help with acne scarring. If you're on a tight budget, that should be your first stop. You can get one on Amazon for less than $20. (Use yours once a week followed by a Vitamin C serum for best results—here's how to pick the best ones.)
Do not—we repeat, do not—even think about attempting to get this out yourself. "With deep zits, there’s no exit strategy, so if you’re pushing on it to try to get rid of it, it could actually leak sebum into the dermis and cause more lesions," explains Dr. Hale. Instead, this is the time to visit your dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which should take care of it in 24 hours. If you're sitting here wondering why doctors don't just shoot all of your zits up with cortisone, that's because that it can actually lead to scarring or even a depression in your skin, especially with smaller zits, says Dr. Chwalek. That's why cortisone shops reserved for the oversize monsters like these.
Drugs: Some medications may cause or worsen acne, such as those containing iodides, bromides, or oral or injected steroids (either the medically prescribed prednisone [Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred] or the steroids that bodybuilders or athletes sometimes take). Other drugs that can cause or aggravate acne are anticonvulsant medications and lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid). Most cases of acne, however, are not drug related.
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