It starts out as a powder (a blend of raw cacao, bamboo charcoal, soil nutrients, and spices), only releasing its potent healing elements when mixed with water. The resulting mousse heals blemishes, fights inflammation, encourages circulation, and visibly tightens pores pretty much instantly. Use Lindstrom’s facial treatment bowl and brush to mix the paste.
Use oil-free makeup. If you wear makeup, you may be stuck in a vicious cycle of covering up acne while simultaneously causing it with your cover-up usage. Find acne-fighting oil-free mineral makeup to help prevent worsening your acne while simply trying to hide it. Power foundations are also recommended. When possible, avoid wearing make-up at all though as it clogs your pores over the course of the day.
"Acne scars are very challenging to treat and are even more challenging to treat once they've been given time to age," says Joel Schlessinger, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist in Omaha, Nebraska. Although he says the best option is prevention (but if you just can't resist popping your pimples, do it the doctor-approved way!), there are ways to treat acne scars to drastically reduce their appearance.

Best used for treating hyperpigmentation, these products — packed with glycolic acid — promote cellular turnover to remove the top layers of the skin revealing a brighter, fresh complexion, says New York City-based dermatologist Dendy Engelman. "Glycolic acid is the smallest acid in size," she says. (This means it can get deep into the skin.) "It is very effective in breaking down skin cells and removing dead particles," says Engleman. "It boosts collagen production and elastin production with the removal of waste and dead skin cells." Bottom line: By removing these dead cells, healthy, glow-y skin is revealed.

Scars are varied and complex, and learning how to get rid of acne marks requires trial and error. There are a variety of ways to get rid of acne scars and each corner has a different proponent. However, before you go jumping on the bandwagon for the latest cure-all, we suggest breaking down the various treatments methods into their disparate parts.

Use retinoid skin products. Retinoids are vitamin A derivatives which are used in a wide array of skin care products treating fine lines and wrinkles, skin discoloration, and acne. Retinoids boost collagen production and speed up cell turnover, making them a great choice for targeting acne scars. These creams can be a little on the pricey side, but they are highly recommended by dermatologists for their fast, effective results.
Light treatments: Recent years have brought reports of success in treating acne using special lights and similar devices, alone or in conjunction with photosensitizing dyes. It appears that these treatments are safe and can be effective, but it is not clear that their success is lasting. At this point, laser treatment of acne is best thought of as an adjunct to conventional therapy, rather than as a substitute.
Instead, you’ll want to talk to your dermatologist about what can be done about your scarring. There are professional procedures that can smooth the skin and minimize scars. Laser treatments are often used to treat acne scars. Your dermatologist might also suggest dermal fillers to “plump up” the depressed area leaving the skin, albeit temporarily, more smooth and even.

There are many treatments for mild acne. Mild acne can consist of whiteheads, blackheads and small pustules. At home, you can wash your face twice per day with warm water and a gentle cleanser or soap. Your doctor may suggest you also try an over-the-counter lotion or cream. These medicines may make your skin dry if you use them too much. Be sure to follow the directions.


I wear a full face of full coverage makeup every weekday for work. To get it all off, I used to rely on makeup wipes before face wash. I later realized the wipes, while convenient for nights you're ready to PTFO and must, were kind of just sliding product around my face instead of truly cleaning it. Thankfully, a facial with celebrity esthetician Renée Rouleau introduced me to the idea of double cleansing.
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacteria that causes chronic inflammation (gastritis) of the inner lining of the stomach, and also is the most common cause of ulcers worldwide. About 50% of people in the world carries or is infected with H. pylori. Common symptoms of H. pylori infection are occasional abdominal discomfort, bloating, belching or burping, and nausea and vomiting. H. pylori infection is difficult to erdicate, and treatment is with two or more antibiotics.
Cysts, which are also called blind pimples, are the very worst kind of acne. Basically, cysts are made up of sebaceous content (again, a gross combination of oil, dirt, and bacteria) that's trapped beneath the skin and has no way out—so they just live and grow under the skin, causing both a bump and, in some cases, pain. "These take longer to resolve on their own, are less responsive to topical treatments, and over time may lead to scarring," says Dr. Chwalek. Um, no thanks.
Mix and match: "Since acne scars vary, so do treatments. Depending on the individual, I often use a multimodal approach to treating acne scars. First, I might use Fraxel treatments to smooth out the skin texture. Then, I often use a combination of the fillers Restylane and Belotero to lift the depressed scars. Finally, I perform a few punch excisions to surgically remove any deep scars that may remain," says Dr. Bowe. There are also topical treatment options for active breakouts that help prevent scarring, which can be used to get out ahead of things.
Shower twice a day. Take a shower or bath in the morning and at night. Alternatively, take a shower in the morning and then again after physical activity, like exercise, or sweating. Wash your entire body with a mild cleanser and use shampoos that limit oil production in your hair. Be sure to always shower after exercising to remove the dead skin cells your body has sloughed off through sweating.
Scars that are indented aren't going to go away on their own and most likely need professional treatment. Talk to your derm about laser options, as well as subcision and microneedling—all proven methods to get rid of scarring. But those brown spots left behind once a zit goes away? You can treat them at home if you're diligent. Dr. Schultz says you have to stick to a regimen of daily sunscreen use, exfoliation, and application of a bleaching product that will help remove the excess pigmentation in the skin. Try Murad Rapid Age Spot and Pigment Lightening Serum.
Coconut oil is all the rage, with uses ranging from hair conditioning to cooking. But some swear by it as a natural acne treatment. To use coconut oil as an acne treatment, you can include it as part of a healthy diet. The fatty acids like lauric acid caprylic acid are metabolized into antibacterial agents in the body. Or, you can apply a very small amount and rub directly onto your skin after cleansing for an extra hydrating boost.
Scrubbing your face daily with grainy cleansers and exfoliating products can do more harm than good. When done too often, it can cause redness, inflammation, and irritation. “Exfoliating a pimple can pull away healthy skin cells and create an open wound and higher risk for scarring,” says Jessica Weiser, MD, from New York Dermatology Group. “Exfoliation should be done with caution, and not more than 2-3 times a week maximum.”
Wear sunscreen everyday and do not tan. Ultraviolet Radiation is the number one cause of premature aging. It also leads to skin cancer in high enough doses. Treat the sun like the death ray that it is. Exposing your skin to harmful UVA and UVB rays damages skin and prolongs post inflammatory erythema(PIE)--red acne marks, as the sunlight stimulates pigment-producing cells.

If you have scarring, your dermatologist may suggest surgery to help heal acne lesions and remove scarring. A laser can reshape scar tissue and reduce redness. Dermabrasion is a type of surgery that can remove surface scars and reduce the depth of deep scars. Another option is to transfer fat from one part of the body to the face. In some cases, a single treatment can help scarring. But for lasting results, several are often needed. There are also topical treatments for acne scarring.

If a pore gets clogged up and closes but bulges out from the skin, you're left with a whitehead. If a pore gets clogged up but stays open, the top surface can darken and you're left with a blackhead. Sometimes the wall of the pore opens, allowing sebum, bacteria, and dead skin cells to make their way under the skin — and you're left with a small, red bump called a pimple (sometimes pimples have a pus-filled top from the body's reaction to the bacterial infection).


When answering the question "why does stress cause acne?", it is important to note that stress is not the definitive catalyst for breakouts, but rather a factor that worsens a previously existing condition. When stress levels are consistently heightened, adrenal glands signal the production of the male hormone androgen, which signals sebaceous oil glands to secrete more sebum. As this excess oil builds up, acne is more likely to develop. As women produce a larger percentage of androgens in the adrenal gland than men, stress more commonly has an affectation on acne frequency in women.
Since the UV rays and visible light from the sun can further darken acne marks, all the dermatologists agree it’s essential to wear sunscreen daily. “Sun protection can make a big difference in whether or not these marks remain permanent,” says Nagler, so much so that she’ll often recommend patients wait and see what their scars look like after a year of careful sun protection before opting for an expensive or invasive procedure. This CeraVe oil-free sunscreen is ideal for acne-prone skin, and also contains niacinamide, which is known to help brighten skin and fight inflammation.
5. You're scrubbing your skin too hard. A lot of people with acne think that the more you scrub your skin with a washcloth, rough exfoliants (like crushed apricot seeds), or cleansing brushes, the smoother your skin will be, but in reality, the problem will only inevitably get worse. What happens when you do that is you scrub the active acne and the blemish bacteria gets spread across the skin, worsening the condition.
Other concerns include inflammatory bowel disease and the risk of depression and suicide in patients taking isotretinoin. Recent evidence seems to indicate that these problems are exceedingly rare. Government oversight has resulted in a highly publicized and very burdensome national registration system for those taking the drug. This has reinforced concerns in many patients and their families have that isotretinoin is dangerous. In fact, large-scale studies so far have shown no convincing evidence of increased risk for those taking isotretinoin compared with the general population. It is important for those taking this drug to report changes in mood or bowel habits (or any other symptoms) to their doctors. Even patients who are being treated for depression are not barred from taking isotretinoin, whose striking success often improves the mood and outlook of patients with severe disease.
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