"Fluctuation in hormones, such as before one's menstrual cycle, is the main cause," explains dermatologist Julia Tzu, M.D., of Wall Street Dermatology. Specifically, androgens (male hormones) like testosterone. This usually rears its ugly head in the form of deep (painful) cystic acne around the chin, neck, and back, says dermatologist Rebecca Kazin, M.D., F.A.A.D., of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and the Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology.
Cleansing . Create a cleansing routine, washing your face each morning and before bed. This alone can significantly reduce acne breakouts. Wash your face for at least a minute to ensure that all bacteria are killed. Make sure to wash away any makeup before going to bed as these products can increase acne outbreaks while damaging the skin. Use oil free products that will not clog the pores during this step. Also wash any other areas where acne appears during this ritual such as your chest, back or shoulders.

Topical vitamin C serum: "Vitamin C serums block abnormal pigment production and can brighten spots that have already developed," says Dr. Zeichner. "They can be layered underneath your sunscreen in the morning." These serums can also help build collagen and promote healing, says says Dr. Shah, who suggests trying "SkinCeuticals C E Ferulic to do the trick.
Acne is a condition of the skin that shows up as different types of bumps. These bumps can be blackheads, whiteheads, pimples, or cysts. Teens get acne because of the hormonal changes that come with puberty. If your parents had acne as teens, it's more likely that you will, too. The good news is that, for most people, acne goes away almost completely by the time they are out of their teens.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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