Retinoids: Retin-A (tretinoin) has been in use for years, and preparations have become milder and gentler while still maintaining its effectiveness. Newer retinoids include adapalene (Differin) and tazarotene (Tazorac). These medications are especially helpful for unclogging pores. Side effects may include irritation and a mild increase in sensitivity to the sun. Adapalene 0.1% is now available without a prescription. With proper sun protection, however, they can be used even during sunny periods. The combination medication known as Epiduo gel -- which contains the retinoid, adapalene, along with the antibacterial, benzoyl peroxide -- is applied once a day.
There have been rumblings about the connection between eating chocolate and acne conditions for years, but a 2014 study showed some promising research that unfortunately does indicate chocolate as a cause of acne flare ups. This study, published in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, took a group of 14 men aged 18 to 35 to examine the effects of cocoa on the skin. On days that followed chocolate consumption, the number of both non-inflammatory and inflammatory pimple lesions grew exponentially.

Clean your skin gently with a mild soap or cleanser twice a day — once in the morning and once at night. You should also gently clean the skin after heavy exercise. Avoid strong soaps and rough scrub pads. Harsh scrubbing of the skin may make acne worse. Wash your entire face from under the jaw to the hairline and rinse thoroughly. Remove make-up gently with a mild soap and water. Ask your doctor before using an astringent.
"I have seen many patients develop a tolerance to prescription acne treatments, and when they stop working, it’s devastating. Treating acne demands a more holistic approach that includes lifestyle, nutrition, and advances in topical skincare. I developed Outsmart Acne™ Clarifying Treatment to be used as part of a whole-person regimen to help skin stay consistently clear."—Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD
Avoid touching or rubbing your face, since that can make acne worse. Try to keep your cell phone from touching your face, too. Use earbuds instead of having the phone against your skin. Also, don't lean your face on your hands, which may carry oils and germs that can irritate blemishes. Sweat can also make acne worse. Sweaty after exercise? Wash up.
Acne treatment that you apply to the skin: Most acne treatments are applied to the skin. Your dermatologist may call this topical treatment. There are many topical acne treatments. Some topicals help kill the bacteria. Others work on reducing the oil. The topical medicine may contain a retinoid, prescription-strength benzoyl peroxide, antibiotic, or even salicylic acid. Your dermatologist will determine what you need.

"Put it this way: It is so common that pimples are meeting wrinkles," dermatologist Neal Schultz, M.D., creator of Beauty Rx Skincare, tells SELF. "For the last 10 to 20 years, adult acne has been increasing. It can even go into your 50s, right to menopause." If you had acne as a teen, chances are, you've got oily skin that's prone to breakouts. But even if you didn't, it's still possible you'll end up with adult acne.
Acne is a common skin condition that plagues people of all ages. Blemishes always seem to appear the day before a special event, so it's a common desire to want to get rid of them overnight. While that's not always possible, what you can do is speed up the healing process by taking extra care of your skin and working to open the clogged pore so the blemish can fully heal.
Phase 2: My Torture Facial After two weeks of adhering to Shamban's strict regimen, I go back to her office for a facial. I'm thinking it's going to be the ultimate doctor visit, like a relaxing spa day with Enya playing and detox tea served at the end. But I hop into the facialist's chair and I'm immediately engulfed in a stringent smell that makes me choke -- a far cry from the lavender and eucalyptus I was expecting. And the process begins. 

Hypo-pigmentation is characterized by the light spots that result from a lack of melanin. With this type of skin damage, melanocytes are depleted from the injured area or lose their ability to produce melanin. This occurs when healthy skin has been replaced with scar tissue. Because scar tissue has a light pink color, it’s more noticeable on people with darker skin tones.

Hormones are ruthless, and all the topical treatments in the world won't make a difference if yours are seriously out of whack. In that case, you need to fix things internally first. "Medications that manipulate hormonal levels, such as oral contraceptives and spironolactone, are helpful in curbing hormonal chin and lower face outbreaks," Dr. Tzu says. Ask your derm about what might work for you.
When it comes to skin care, we're not usually ones for hard and fast rules. Everyone has unique skin types, skin tones, lifestyles, and genetic histories that make it impossible to have a single piece of one-size-fits-all advice. It can take years — and dozens of trips to the dermatologist — to discover how to treat acne effectively on your unique skin. But here at Teen Vogue, we've pretty much made it our life mission to figure out the best tips from the pros to point you in the right direction. They've seen it all and won't recommend it unless it's backed up by experience and science,.
The first and most important rule isn't groundbreaking: Remember to wash your face! Cleansing and treating your skin twice a day is the best way to keep breakouts away. For those emergencies when you're just too tired to wash your face, keep a stash of face wipes in the drawer of your nightstand. This way if you get home super late and don’t feel like going all the way to the sink, you can still go to bed with clean skin!

If you’re dealing with an acne breakout, avoid touching your face or popping any pimples to prevent the acne from spreading. Wash your face no more than twice a day and moisturize regularly in order to clear your skin up. Make sure you're eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, fish, and nuts, and stay away from sugary drinks and fast food. You can also try treating stubborn acne with benzoyl peroxide cream, salicylic acid, and tea tree oil. For tips on how to treat acne with vitamins, astringents, and natural antihistamines, read on!

Skin-care geeks rejoiced when the formerly Rx-only Differin gel became available over the counter, in 2016. A prescription-strength retinoid, Differin also affects cell turnover faster than OTC retinols to prevent the formation of new acne. Avram recommends it for those dealing with a lot of small pimples and only the occasional monster cyst. Because Nagler says retinoids “encouraging collagen remodeling,” a well-tolerated formula like Differin can also reduce the appearance of deeper scars.
Acne occurs when the small pores on the surface of the skin become blocked with oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria. Each individual pore on the skin opens up to a follicle beneath the epidermis. Within these follicles lie a singular hair and a sebaceous gland. The sebaceous gland produces sebum, an oil designed to keep your skin lubricated and soft. However, when hormonal changes and other factors cause the gland to produce an excess of sebum, the oil will be pumped through the follicle, and may pick up dead skin cells and P. acnes bacteria on its way out. Should these substances clump together, a plug will form. As this plug starts to press up against the surface of the skin, the body responds with an accumulation of red and white blood cells to combat any infection, and this results in inflammation and redness. Acne can occur on the face, back, neck, chest, arms, and buttocks, and any other skin area with a saturation of sebaceous pores.
Acne removal: Your dermatologist may perform a procedure called “drainage and extraction” to remove a large acne cyst. This procedure helps when the cyst does not respond to medicine. It also helps ease the pain and the chance that the cyst will leave a scar. If you absolutely have to get rid of a cyst quickly, your dermatologist may inject the cyst with medicine.
Another potential skin saboteur is sugar, because it raises your insulin level. More and more evidence shows that insulin may boost those oil-triggering male hormones, Dr. Schultz explains. Stick to low-glycemic foods—ones that have complex carbs like whole grains, which break down slower in the body and cause less of an insulin spike. Your health will be better for it, too.
Medications prescribed for mental illnesses can have the unfortunate side effect of causing acne. Some antidepressants have been purported to trigger acne breakouts, including brands like Wellbutrin and Lexapro. Those diagnosed with bipolar disorder are often prescribed lithium to help handle their condition. Unfortunately, lithium can cause acne breakouts. Often the benefits of these types of drugs outweigh the negative onset of acne, but it’s important to look into various options to determine what might have the minimal amount of side effects.
Clear, perfect, glowy skin is pretty much a magical unicorn we’ve been chasing since we hit puberty. We love to believe it exists, but for most of us it’s a myth that only exists in fairy tales. And, honestly, the internet doesn’t help much. There are so many supposedly “natural” DIYs floating around the World Wide Web, it’s hard to tell what treatments and tips are real—and what’s a bunch of BS.
The one food Dr. Schultz does recommend to avoid is iodine. "Iodine causes acne in everyone if you eat enough," he says. You can find it in shellfish, like lobster, shrimp, crab, and some greens like kelp and spinach. The different between iodine and those other "acne-causing foods" is that iodine builds up over weeks and months before it starts to affect skin.
Exfoliating cleansers and masks: A variety of mild scrubs, exfoliants, and masks can be used. These products may contain salicylic acid in a concentration that makes it a very mild peeling agent. These products remove the outer layer of the skin and thus open pores. Products containing glycolic or alpha hydroxy acids are also gentle skin exfoliants.
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