Consider exfoliating with baking soda. Baking soda can be used to exfoliate the skin and minimize the appearance of acne scars. All you need to do is mix one teaspoon of baking soda with two teaspoons of water to form a liquid paste. Apply this paste all over your face and use gentle circular motions to rub the baking soda into the skin, concentrating on the scarred areas, for about two minutes. Rinse off with warm water and pat the skin dry. [10]
Many people also report a direct relation towards dairy consumption and acne, with many reporting a complete clear up after cutting dairy out of their diet. While it is an effective way to deal with the problem, your body does still require the nutrients from dairy to remain healthy, so if you do cut it out, make sure you find other sources for the nutrients, including a supplement.

This unique ability exhibited by cocoa butter to lock moisture at a deeper levels of the skin makes it effective in healing the acne scars. This way, it keeps the skin well hydrated. A well hydrated skin can only regrow the skin tissue. New skin tissue in place of scarred ones definitely will give a blemish free skin. Therefore, when you use cocoa butter daily, you help the damaged skin to get repaired.
There you have it! As with any skin condition, it's best to consult your regular dermatologist to see which option is best for you. And while technology has come a long way in making dark marks and acne scars treatable, remember that most of us will experience them at some point. So while these are all feasible options for fading your acne scars, don't forget that you always have the choice of pimple positivity, too.
"Other good over-the-counter options are benzoyl peroxide-containing agents," says Dr. Engelman. "I like La Roche-Posay Effaclar Duo. Benzoyl peroxide is anti-microbial, attacking the bacteria that is associated with acne. The La Roche Posay product also contains Lipohydroxy acid (LHA), which serves as an exfoliator to smooth roughness and even out skin texture."
Medications prescribed for mental illnesses can have the unfortunate side effect of causing acne. Some antidepressants have been purported to trigger acne breakouts, including brands like Wellbutrin and Lexapro. Those diagnosed with bipolar disorder are often prescribed lithium to help handle their condition. Unfortunately, lithium can cause acne breakouts. Often the benefits of these types of drugs outweigh the negative onset of acne, but it’s important to look into various options to determine what might have the minimal amount of side effects.

Clear, perfect, glowy skin is pretty much a magical unicorn we’ve been chasing since we hit puberty. We love to believe it exists, but for most of us it’s a myth that only exists in fairy tales. And, honestly, the internet doesn’t help much. There are so many supposedly “natural” DIYs floating around the World Wide Web, it’s hard to tell what treatments and tips are real—and what’s a bunch of BS.
Fractional laser treatment is less invasive than ablative laser treatment, as it targets only a fraction of the skin at a time. Fractional lasers penetrate the top skin layers, where its light energy stimulates collagen production and resurfaces the top layer of the epidermis. Treatments typically last between 15 and 45 minutes and effects become visible in 1 to 3 weeks.
While SPF is a must, some sunscreens can trigger breakouts. You want to look for oil-free and non-comedogenic formulas that won't clog pores,” says Karen Hammerman, MD, from Schweiger Dermatology. Options from brands like Elta MD and Peter Thomas Roth, which are recommended by the pros, are specifically tested on acneic skin so you can get your dose of SPF without having to worry about clogged pores.
It is a myth that women get acne because they don't wash enough. Too much washing or scrubbing the skin harshly can make acne worse. And washing away surface oils doesn't do much to prevent or cure acne, because it forms under the skin. The best way to clean the face is to gently wash it twice a day with a mild soap or cleanser. Be careful to remove make-up without harsh scrubbing.

Drugs: Some medications may cause or worsen acne, such as those containing iodides, bromides, or oral or injected steroids (either the medically prescribed prednisone [Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred] or the steroids that bodybuilders or athletes sometimes take). Other drugs that can cause or aggravate acne are anticonvulsant medications and lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid). Most cases of acne, however, are not drug related.
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