Pimples are raised red spots with a white center that develop when blocked hair follicles become inflamed or infected with bacteria. Blockages and inflammation that develop deep inside hair follicles produce cystlike lumps beneath the surface of your skin. Other pores in your skin, which are the openings of the sweat glands, aren't usually involved in acne.
Topical (external) applications: Antibacterial cleansers come in the form of gels, creams, and lotions that are applied to the affected area. The active ingredients that kill surface bacteria include benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, and resorcinol. Some brands promoted on the Internet and cable TV (such as ProActiv) are much more costly than identical and sometimes more potent products one can buy in the drugstore.
Whether your acne has persisted since your teenage years or has appeared as a new skin problem in later life, consider seeing a dermatologist if you're looking for treatment options. A specialist can help you determine the factors which may be triggering your acne and can help you with prescription medications to help regulate hormones or treat your breakouts without drying or otherwise irritating your aging skin.
What you do when a pimple dies down is just as important as what you do when it's just beginning its life. When my zits came to the surface as whiteheads, I'd carefully, gently pop them using two clean cotton swabs (not fingers!) and immediately apply one of these dots. I know popping is the number one sin for skin care, but these dots work best when the zit is punctured because it's made with hydrocolloid, which extracts debris out of the pore (so there needs to be an opening). It also infused with salicylic acid and vitamin A to treat and ease down redness. When the stickers are worn overnight, pimples totally flatten out by morning.

Consider cosmetic surgery. As a last resort, consult with a medical professional about surgery for large, deep lesions or scars. In this procedure, a doctor will use a punch excision to cut out the scar and replace it with stitching or a skin graft. Smaller lesions require only stitching, while large lesions may require a skin graft from another part of your body.[15]
Sunscreen: "Sun exposure during an active breakout can lead to darkening of inflammatory lesions, prolonging their appearance on your skin and making them harder to fade over time," says Dr. Shereene Idriss from Union Square Dermatology, which means it's important to lather on the sunscreen daily — even when it's cloudy. And don't worry about breaking out from a pore-clogging sunscreen; the latest formulas are more innovative and acne-friendly than ever. Elta MD UV Clear Broad-Spectrum SPF 46 is a top derm-approved favorite. It contains niacinamide, which is an anti-inflammatory that helps reduce redness.
Alcohol-based toners have been an anti-acne step since forever, but are so harsh and drying on skin that they can cause skin to produce even more oil, and they can irritate; as with benzoyl peroxide or any other irritant, they can further inflame a case of acne. But dabbing skin with witch hazel or non-alcohol toner (we love S.W. Basics’ toner with witch hazel and raw apple cider vinegar, $9.99, swbasicsofbk.com) can serve as a mild exfoliant, to unclog pores and deposit ingredients like tea tree oil or salicylic acid. Tea Tree Oil Facial Cleansing pads from Desert Essence ($7.99, desertessence.com) are particularly brilliant, combining both ingredients.

Drugs: Some medications may cause or worsen acne, such as those containing iodides, bromides, or oral or injected steroids (either the medically prescribed prednisone [Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred] or the steroids that bodybuilders or athletes sometimes take). Other drugs that can cause or aggravate acne are anticonvulsant medications and lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid). Most cases of acne, however, are not drug related.
×