This might annoy your mom, but using your fingers to chat could save your skin. Just think of all those oils, all that bacteria and all those germs on your iPhone. When you hold it up to your face, it’s a little like rubbing your cheek on a New York City sidewalk. {Shudder.} When you need to talk, wipe your phone with a cleansing wipe or go hands-free.
The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

I wear a full face of full coverage makeup every weekday for work. To get it all off, I used to rely on makeup wipes before face wash. I later realized the wipes, while convenient for nights you're ready to PTFO and must, were kind of just sliding product around my face instead of truly cleaning it. Thankfully, a facial with celebrity esthetician Renée Rouleau introduced me to the idea of double cleansing.


Blackheads are a mild form of acne that appear as unsightly, open pores that appear darker than the skin surrounding them. They get their dark appearance from a skin pigment called melanin, which oxidizes and turns black when it's exposed to the air. Blackheads aren't caused by dirt, but by sebum (oil) and dead skin cells blocking the pore. If the pore remains open, it becomes a blackhead; if it's completely blocked and closed, it turns into a whitehead.
Physicians commonly prescribe oral antibiotics to patients with moderate rosacea. Tetracycline (Sumycin), doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea, Adoxa, Atridox), and minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin), are oral antibiotics commonly prescribed are presumed to work by reducing inflammation. A newer low-dose doxycycline preparation called Oracea (40 mg once a day) treats rosacea. The dose may be initially high and then be tapered to maintenance levels. Patients should consider common side effects and potential risks before taking oral antibiotics.
Like acne on your face, back acne occurs when your pores become blocked with oil and dead skin cells.. Exfoliating your back regularly might help remove these dead skin cells and pore-clogging debris before they have a chance to block pores. However, you want to take care not to scrub too hard, especially if you are experiencing an active breakout. Use a soft cloth to gently brush away surface impurities as you shower.
No one factor causes acne. Acne happens when oil (sebaceous) glands are activated at puberty, stimulated by male hormones from the adrenal glands in both boys and girls. Oil is a natural substance which lubricates and protects the skin. Under certain circumstances, cells that are close to the surface block the openings of sebaceous glands and cause a buildup of oil underneath. This oil stimulates bacteria, which live in everyone's skin and generally cause no problems, to multiply and cause surrounding tissues to become inflamed.
Some individuals have absolutely no symptoms, and rosacea doesn't bother them. They may enjoy perfectly healthy normal lives without any effect from this benign skin condition. Some patients really like the pink glow to their cheeks and find it gives them a pleasant color without having to use blush. They may not even know they have rosacea. They usually do not want to use any treatment.
Isotretinoin: Accutane was the original brand name; there are now several generic versions in common use, including Sotret, Claravis, and Amnesteem. Isotretinoin is an excellent treatment for severe, scarring, persistent acne and has been used on millions of patients since it was introduced in Europe in 1971 and in the U.S. in 1982. It should be used for people with severe acne, chiefly of the cystic variety, that has been unresponsive to conventional therapies like those listed above. If taken in sufficient dosage, it should eliminate the need to continue the use of prescription drugs in most patients. The drug has many potential serious side effects and requires a number of unique controls before it is prescribed. This means that isotretinoin is not a good choice for people whose acne is not that severe but who are frustrated and want "something that will knock acne out once and for all." In order to use the drug, the prescribing physician, the patient, and the supplying pharmacy must be enrolled in the online "iPLEDGE PROGRAM." Used properly, isotretinoin is safe and produces few side effects beyond dry lips and occasional muscle aches. This drug is prescribed for five to six months at a dosage that has a high likelihood of preventing the return of acne. Fasting blood tests are monitored monthly to check liver function and the level of triglycerides, substances related to cholesterol, which often rise a bit during treatment but rarely to the point at which treatment has to be modified or stopped.
There are breakouts, and then there are breakouts so bad that make me, a grown woman, literally hide under a blanket. The latter happened over a month ago and, as much as I'm here for the growing skin positivity movement, I have to admit my confidence hit an all-time low. I cancelled plans. I stared unhealthily often at a mirror, examining the damage: a colony of seemingly multiplying cystic zits invaded my chin and jawline like never before. How did I get here?
Lemon juice is an excellent skin lightening agent. It is the acid in lemon juice that helps brighten your skin and make the scars less visible. It can, in fact, fade away freckles and lighten the dark scars faster. Not only scars, if you have swollen pimples, lemon juice can help reduce its redness too. And it is probably the most easily available ingredient lying there in your fridge. So, you just need to get it from there and squeeze out some of its fresh juice to apply to your acne scar, every day! However, just do not step out in sun after applying lemon juice to your skin. It makes your skin sensitive to sun’s rays. Even hours after when you step out of your home, do not forget to apply sunscreen to shield your skin.
We start with a consultation. An esthetician will examine your skin to determine your skin type and the severity of your scarring. Then they’ll decide how many treatments you’ll need. Typically, dark skin requires more treatments. Because dark skin is more prone to produce pigment, we reduce the amount of energy for each treatment. That way, you’ll avoid dark pigmented areas after your treatment.

Blackheads are a mild form of acne that appear as unsightly, open pores that appear darker than the skin surrounding them. They get their dark appearance from a skin pigment called melanin, which oxidizes and turns black when it's exposed to the air. Blackheads aren't caused by dirt, but by sebum (oil) and dead skin cells blocking the pore. If the pore remains open, it becomes a blackhead; if it's completely blocked and closed, it turns into a whitehead.


No one factor causes acne. Acne occurs when sebaceous (oil) glands attached to the hair follicles are stimulated at the time of puberty or due to other hormonal changes. Sebum (oil) is a natural substance that lubricates and protects the skin. Associated with increased oil production is a change in the manner in which the skin cells mature, predisposing them to plug the follicular pore. The plug can appear as a whitehead if it is covered by a thin layer of skin, or if exposed to the air, the darker exposed portion of the plug is called a "blackhead." The plugged hair follicle gradually enlarges, producing a bump. As the follicle enlarges, the wall may rupture, allowing irritating substances and normal skin bacteria access into the deeper layers of the skin, ultimately producing inflammation. Inflammation near the skin's surface produces a pustule; deeper inflammation results in a papule (pimple); if the inflammation is deeper still, it forms a cyst.
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