Oral contraceptives: Oral contraceptives (birth control pills), which are low in estrogen to promote safety, have little effect on acne one way or the other. Some contraceptive pills have been shown to have modest effectiveness in treating acne. Those that have been U.S. FDA approved for treating acne are Estrostep, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, and Yaz. Most dermatologists work together with primary care physicians or gynecologists when recommending these medications.
Birth controls can affect hormone levels, and some women may be finding that their birth control is causing acne due to increases in sebum production. This rise in sebum can affect the skin, clogging up pores and leading to acne. According to The Huffington Post, birth control pills that contain androgen-based progestin have been indicated as the most likely offender.

It's best to consult a primary care physician or dermatologist if an individual is unable to adequately control his or her acne. The goal of treatment should be the prevention of scarring (not a flawless complexion) so that after the condition spontaneously resolves there is no lasting sign of the affliction. Here are some of the options available:


Your body is capable of taking care of your scars and they will get lighter with time. However, if you expose them to the sun, their healing process will slow down and the scars will get darker. So, avoid the sun. If it’s essential to go out in sun, use sunscreen to guard your skin and also cover yourself with hat, umbrella, clothes- whatever you can lay hands on.
Cystic Acne: The most severe type of acne, cystic acne requires dermatological care and prescription acne medication to treat. Even the best acne products available over the counter are no match for this painful condition in which the area of the outbreak becomes inflamed, but not infected. Cystic acne can result in permanent scarring. However, it's important to know that all acne lesions can scar. Scarring is related to size, amount of inflammation, genetics and delay in therapy.

The bad news: There's no secret ingredient or miracle gadget that makes scars totally disappear. Don't get discouraged, though. A lot of what you think is acne scarring is really just hyperpigmentation or erythema (brown or red spots) rather than an actual change in the texture of the skin. Plus, there's a bevy of gels, creams, and treatments that can bring that discoloration down. We asked top dermatologists to recommend the most effective of the bunch.
All the above remedies for acne scars are good but there are some that will be more suitable for your skin type. Find out them by experimenting with each and every remedy for scars. Have patience and treat your scars with these remedies and you will definitely get rid of your acne scars. Patience will be the main ingredient though, whatever remedy you adopt for your acne scars!
It Works...THE BEST...I'm not sure what it is about this product, but I was given an acne prescription by my actual doctor to help control hormonal acne as well as cystic acne and that acne prescription never worked as good at this product does....I used this one a few zits I had, two new ones and two almost healed ones, after I washed my face with the Neogen green tea cleanser and I used the Korres Wild Rose moisturizer after this spot treatment, and so far I love it.
"Leafy green vegetables and other brightly-colored fruit and vegetables which are rich in antioxidants and nutrients dampen inflammation and improve skin quality (studies have shown acne patients have higher oil production and lower antioxidant levels)," says Dr. Weiser. "Limit intake of dairy products, which can contain hormones and antibiotics that can worsen acne breakouts." Other skin-boosting superfoods include eggs, nuts, legumes, and quinoa.
A recent study has found a difference between strains of acne bacteria, which could have a significant impact on acne treatment down the road. This study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, found that these strains play a role in the severity and frequency of developing pimples. One particular strain of P. acnes was found among study participants that exhibited few symptoms of acne. Researchers came to the conclusion that this “good” strain of bacteria features a natural defense mechanism that fights back bacteria which might infect the cell. Researchers are hopeful that this discovery will help dermatologists better and more accurately prescribe effective acne treatment in the future, and reduce the severity of acne by ridding the skin of bad acne bacteria while preserving the good. 
Do not—we repeat, do not—even think about attempting to get this out yourself. "With deep zits, there’s no exit strategy, so if you’re pushing on it to try to get rid of it, it could actually leak sebum into the dermis and cause more lesions," explains Dr. Hale. Instead, this is the time to visit your dermatologist for a cortisone injection, which should take care of it in 24 hours. If you're sitting here wondering why doctors don't just shoot all of your zits up with cortisone, that's because that it can actually lead to scarring or even a depression in your skin, especially with smaller zits, says Dr. Chwalek. That's why cortisone shops reserved for the oversize monsters like these.
Some of us are more at risk for acne scars than others, although there is no way to say for sure who will develop scars after acne and who will not. These scars tend to occur more commonly after inflammatory acne, especially when it’s not treated early and aggressively. Other risks include picking squeezing or popping zits. (But whatever you do, never, ever pop a zit in the “danger triangle.”) Genetics can also play a role. “The earlier that acne gets treated, the better,” says Dr. Levine. “If somebody has active acne at 13 or 14, we want to jump on it.” Some scar resurfacing treatments also help keep acne at bay, she says. Dr. Imber adds that Youth Corridor RetinUltimate Transforming Gel applied twice daily can help treat active acne and prevent recurrence. Next, find out how to get rid of acne once and for all.
The redness in rosacea, often aggravated by flushing, may cause small blood vessels in the face to enlarge (dilate) permanently and become more visible through the skin, appearing like tiny red lines (called telangiectasias). Continual or repeated episodes of flushing and blushing may promote inflammation, causing small red bumps, or papules, that often resemble teenage acne. Acne rosacea and adult acne are other names for rosacea. One of the most unpleasant aspects of rosacea is the overgrowth of dermal tissues producing a "phymatous" change in the skin. This appears as a thickening and permanent swelling of the facial tissues. A bulbous nose called rhinophyma is an example of this change.

9. You're not releasing pent-up stress properly. Stress triggers acne and acne results in more stress, so it's a very vicious cycle. Basically, when you're under pressure, your skin produces stress hormones, including cortisol, that can stimulate your oil glands to make testosterone that then increases oil production and clogs pores. (Tip via Dr. Downie.)
Stress: Being under stress can boost the production of male hormones called androgens. These hormones, which naturally occur in both men and women, stimulate oil production and can worsen acne. Experts believe that an excessive amount of androgens, a condition called hyperandrogenism, may be a significant cause of late-onset acne in women who didn't have acne as adolescents.
Our skin contains millions of small sebaceous glands underneath the surface. These glands excrete an oil, called sebum, that helps to keep our skin smooth and supple. This oil is released via pores, which are small holes on the surface of the skin, which is also where hairs grow out of. When the body produces a lot of sebum, the skin can feel oily and these pores can become clog. It is when these pores become clogged that germs and bacteria can thrive and grow. The result – pimples.
Although cow's milk has a low glycaemic index, it contains androgens, oestrogen, progesterone and glucocorticoids, which also provoke keratinisation and sebum production. Milk also contains amino acids (eg arginine, leucine, and phenylalanine) that produce insulin when combined with carbohydrates. Other components of milk that might induce comedones include whey proteins and iodine.

Unwashed sheets and pillowcases lead to cross contamination which leads to pimples. Aim to wash your bedding once or twice a week to prevent bacteria from building up and affecting your complexion, suggests Dr. Papantoniou. If that seems overboard, at least aim to wash your pillowcase once a week since that's where your face rests while you snooze (and dream of flawless skin).
Alcohol-based toners have been an anti-acne step since forever, but are so harsh and drying on skin that they can cause skin to produce even more oil, and they can irritate; as with benzoyl peroxide or any other irritant, they can further inflame a case of acne. But dabbing skin with witch hazel or non-alcohol toner (we love S.W. Basics’ toner with witch hazel and raw apple cider vinegar, $9.99, swbasicsofbk.com) can serve as a mild exfoliant, to unclog pores and deposit ingredients like tea tree oil or salicylic acid. Tea Tree Oil Facial Cleansing pads from Desert Essence ($7.99, desertessence.com) are particularly brilliant, combining both ingredients.
What you can do differently: Gently wash and moisturize your face with a gentle yet effective system (cleanser, toner, moisturizer) that contains pore-clearing ingredients, like alpha hydroxy acids and glycolic and lactic acids. That way you keep the scrubbing to a minimum. Wright recommends Obagi Foaming Gel, Toner and Exfoderm Lotion, her favorite system to suggest for Dangene's acne-prone clients.
Kiehl’s is inspired by its rich heritage as an old-world apothecary, applying over 165 years’ worth of cosmetic, pharmaceutical, herbal, and medicinal knowledge into the formulations. They utilize the finest natural ingredients and incorporate advanced scientific technologies to ensure the highest quality and most efficacious formulas without compromise. They are protective of the environment as they maximize the use of renewable, sustainable, and biodegradable ingredients. Kiehl’s proudly stands behind the quality, efficacy, and safety of each of their products.
What you do when a pimple dies down is just as important as what you do when it's just beginning its life. When my zits came to the surface as whiteheads, I'd carefully, gently pop them using two clean cotton swabs (not fingers!) and immediately apply one of these dots. I know popping is the number one sin for skin care, but these dots work best when the zit is punctured because it's made with hydrocolloid, which extracts debris out of the pore (so there needs to be an opening). It also infused with salicylic acid and vitamin A to treat and ease down redness. When the stickers are worn overnight, pimples totally flatten out by morning.
I tried many different products from over-the-counter acne treatments to expensive prescription medications. Price ranged from $5 to over $100. I even have books on “How to Clear Acne in 24 Hours”, “How to Clear Pimples in a Week”, or even “How to Clear Break Outs through Hypnosis”. I was an acne treatment junkie! I would buy anything for a clear complexion.
While over-the-counter products don’t treat the hormonal component of acne, salicylic acid—a.k.a. willow bark, a.k.a. what aspirin is made of—addresses all other aspects involved in a breakout. “It works,” says Anolik, who recommends using salicylic acid-based products in conjunction with benzoyl peroxide preparations that target acne bacteria with greater strength. Benzoyl peroxide can definitely cause dryness and irritation; if you decide not to use it, know that you’ve got to be even more vigilant about the bacteria on your skin, so cleanse and treat more often. Tea-tree oil preparations like Tammy Fender’s Clarifying Dermagel ($72, goop.com) help. Burt’s Bees Natural Solutions Acne Spot Treatment ($10, burtsbees.com) combines tea tree and salicylic acid for powerful (yet easy on skin) results.

11. You need to clean your phone, too. If you're seeing pimples on your cheeks or anywhere near the area where you hold your phone, they may be from those hour-long convos with your crush. Your phone picks up lots of dirt and bacteria (from your hands, your bag, the kitchen counter), which can then get transferred to your face when you're chatting on the phone. Wipe your screen with an anti-bacterial wipe often to get rid of dirt and germs.
Your skin really is much like the cover of a book. It is the first thing people notice about you, and inside of it, holds many wonders and mysteries. However, much like how all book covers don’t look the alike, the same can be said for a person’s skin, as there are many factors, most of which are outside of our control, that can impact the way it looks.

In the recent times, Vitamin E has been considerably recognized as one of the very beneficial vitamins for human skin. It can thoroughly moisturize your skin and in this process, it makes the scars or spots on your skin less noticeable. This is all because it hydrates your skin well with its moisturizing properties. There is one more theory regarding vitamin E and its effectiveness in reducing acne scars. This theory says that vitamin E assists vitamin A in your body. Vitamin A is thought to be vital for a good skin. When you have vitamin E, present in many fruits and vegetables, the fat in your body absorbs this vitamin E. It then works with vitamin A to give you soft, supple and blemish free skin. Deficiency of vitamin E can even lead to dry skin and acne breakouts. Therefore, it is always advisable to provide your body with sufficient vitamin E. Now the question arises, how to use vitamin E on acne scars! Here’s how to do so.


Rena Levi is known for her sensitivity towards clients with severe acne and problem skin. In 1968 she moved from Israel to the U.S. and studied with Christine Valmy at the European Esthetic Skincare Institute. In 1975, she opened the Rena Levi Skin Care Salon in New York City. In 1980, she moved to Albuquerque, NM, where she managed the skin care center for Eleganza Salon and further developed and refined her practice. It was there that she became well known for her ability to treat what many considered impossible skin, while also teaching budding estheticians and skin practitioners at the same time, including the then-president of the New Mexico Board of Cosmetology. Here, Levi shares with us one of her most popular facial protocol treatments for treating clients with moderate to severe acne.
"I have terrible cystic acne but I don't want to take prescription medication!" she whines. Puh-leeze! You are given treatment, have access to products other than cleansers, but won't use them. This is a ridiculous article. I cleared my skin with soap, water, alcohol, and a complete dietary adjustment. Zero sugar, starch, breads, oils, fried and processed foods. I eat broccoli, greens (lots of greens), steamed and poached veggies, broiled or canned salmon, tofu, quinoa, brown rice, half a lemon a day over food or in unsweetened green tea, and blueberries. Someone else mentioned the sugar/insulin/hormonal imbalance link. You have to take responsibility for your lifestyle, as well as your treatment.
Steroids have long been known to cause acne. These drugs are generally taken without a prescription in order to gain muscle, but there are instances in which women are prescribed steroids for rare conditions. Steroids cause hormonal changes, and as the androgen hormones increase, so too does oil production. The more sebum, the greater chance of clogged pores. Steroids might also accelerate the growth of P. acnes, which can make pimples and inflammation worse.
Cocoa butter is a fat and an excellent moisturizer as well as emollient. It can quickly melt due to the high body temperature. This quality makes the butter easily absorbable into the skin. In fact, it not only penetrates the top layer of the skin but it goes deep within the skin into the dermis. Thus, it enters the site where the skin can retain the moisture for a longer time. A well moisturized skin is the skin that makes spots and scars less visible!

Extractions: An extraction is the physical unclogging of a clogged pore. The aesthetician pushes a tool called an extractor around each acne lesion, forcing the pus, bacteria, and sometimes blood up through the clogged follicle opening. It is an aggressive procedure that should only be performed by an experienced aesthetician or dermatologist as it can damage your pores if done incorrectly.
I can't disagree with much of this. I was almost half expecting some wild remedy. :) When I was younger I had very bad cystic acne. I took tetracycline, minocycline, doxicycline, I used topicals like Retin-A, Cleocin-T, salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide. I began using the Citrus Clear products on a regular, daily basis. Also I never touch my hands to my face, and the result has been acne free. NOt even an occasional pimple.
A benzoyl peroxide cream (2.5 percent strength) is a good choice for adolescents experiencing red or inflamed breakouts that aren't getting better with medicated cleansers. Benzoyl peroxide is a very common and inexpensive acne treatment cream that can be found over-the-counter in the skin care aisle. Benzoyl peroxide kills the bacteria that cause pimples and is highly successful in treating mild cases of acne.
If you have oily or combination skin and are prone to breakouts, you should be using skin-care products labeled "oil-free," "non-comedogenic," or "water-based," Dr. Schultz says. Just one of these will ensure that the lotion you're slathering on isn't going to clog your pores and make matters worse. Try a gel-based moisturizer like Belif The True Cream Aqua Bomb; for an SPF option, we like PCA Skin Weightless Protection Broad Spectrum SPF.
Rolling scars can look like little saucers, giving the skin a wavy texture. Lasers that resurface the skin are Dr. Karolak's top treatment pick for this type of scar, and Dr. Sobel agrees. "Many scars can be improved with lasers such as the matrix CO2, which remove the outer layers of skin, burning away the scar tissue and stimulate new collagen production," he says. "Non-ablative lasers such as the Fraxel can help activate the production of collagen without damaging the surface of the skin." Keep in mind, that these laser treatments can take a bit of recovery time and require multiple treatments to see results. For a quicker solution, your dermatologist can plump the bowl-like scar with fillers like Juvederm, Restylane, or Bellafill.
Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation is not an acne scar, but a red, pink, brown or tan skin discoloration where acne has previously flared up. It will usually disappear on its own in a year or so. Many skin lightening products claim to help reduce the visibility of these acne “scars." Their active ingredient, hydroquinone, works to slow melanin production and can reduce dark brown marks, but melanin isn't the cause of red and pink acne discolorations. A better option is to use the best foundation for acne prone skin you can find to hide the marks until they naturally fade away.
Like acne on your face, back acne occurs when your pores become blocked with oil and dead skin cells.. Exfoliating your back regularly might help remove these dead skin cells and pore-clogging debris before they have a chance to block pores. However, you want to take care not to scrub too hard, especially if you are experiencing an active breakout. Use a soft cloth to gently brush away surface impurities as you shower.

7. You smoke. Every time you light up a cigarette, you decrease the amount of oxygen that goes to your face. This not only predisposes you to cancer, and causes the breakdown of collagen and elastin that leads to wrinkles and increased pore size, but the carcinogens in the smoke also irritates your skin and dries it out, triggering your skin to produce more oil and possibly more breakouts. (Tip via Dr. Downie.)
True acne scars — as in indentations in the skin like ice-pick scars — can only be erased with professional procedures like microneedling or lasers. Fortunately, what most of us refer to as “scars,” according to Julia Tzu, M.D., founder and medical director of Wall Street Dermatology, are actually marks caused by post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (brown spots) or post-inflammatory erythema (red spots), that will fade over several months or years. Fortunately, there are products that can speed up the process.
Sure, we’ve all heard that toothpaste or rubbing alcohol can help dry out a zit, but many DIY treatments aren't solutions for how to treat acne. In fact, applying toothpaste or rubbing alcohol are more likely to cause irritation and dryness than treat the actual pimple. Instead, stick with topical over-the-counter and prescription spot treatments with salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide that are specially made to target pimples, says Dr. Hammerman. For an all-natural spot treatment, she suggests dabbing tea tree oil on the area a few times a day with a cotton ball.
While over-the-counter products don’t treat the hormonal component of acne, salicylic acid—a.k.a. willow bark, a.k.a. what aspirin is made of—addresses all other aspects involved in a breakout. “It works,” says Anolik, who recommends using salicylic acid-based products in conjunction with benzoyl peroxide preparations that target acne bacteria with greater strength. Benzoyl peroxide can definitely cause dryness and irritation; if you decide not to use it, know that you’ve got to be even more vigilant about the bacteria on your skin, so cleanse and treat more often. Tea-tree oil preparations like Tammy Fender’s Clarifying Dermagel ($72, goop.com) help. Burt’s Bees Natural Solutions Acne Spot Treatment ($10, burtsbees.com) combines tea tree and salicylic acid for powerful (yet easy on skin) results.

Everything you need to know about blackheads Blackheads are small lesions that often appear on the face or neck. They are a feature of mild acne, and handling blackheads in the right way can help to prevent the acne from becoming more severe. We look at ways to reduce and treat breakouts. Learn more about what causes blackheads and how to get rid of them here. Read now


Acne scars, on the other hand, are formed when there is damage to the skin which leads to abnormal collagen production, and usually appear raised or bumpy. "There are two types of acne scars: depressed and raised. Depressed scars may look like pits or craters, and raised scars may be firm and tender," explains Dr. Zeichner, who notes that unfortunately, these are permanent.
Punch excisions: "This procedure is best for those with icepick scars, which aren't as wide as rolling or boxcar scars," says Dr. Shah. "If you use a punch excision on a scar that's wide at the surface, you're making a bigger punch and trading in one scar for another," she says. "Your dermatologist will numb up the area and use a tiny cookie-cutter like device to cut out the scar, and then sew it closed with a tiny stitch. The stitch is removed in less than a week," says Dr. Bowe. However, Dr. Idriss cautions against this method for those with darker skin or undertones who are prone to hyperpigmentation.
The redness in rosacea, often aggravated by flushing, may cause small blood vessels in the face to enlarge (dilate) permanently and become more visible through the skin, appearing like tiny red lines (called telangiectasias). Continual or repeated episodes of flushing and blushing may promote inflammation, causing small red bumps, or papules, that often resemble teenage acne. Acne rosacea and adult acne are other names for rosacea. One of the most unpleasant aspects of rosacea is the overgrowth of dermal tissues producing a "phymatous" change in the skin. This appears as a thickening and permanent swelling of the facial tissues. A bulbous nose called rhinophyma is an example of this change.
Hormones are ruthless, and all the topical treatments in the world won't make a difference if yours are seriously out of whack. In that case, you need to fix things internally first. "Medications that manipulate hormonal levels, such as oral contraceptives and spironolactone, are helpful in curbing hormonal chin and lower face outbreaks," Dr. Tzu says. Ask your derm about what might work for you.
Acne scars are most often the product of an inflamed lesion, such as a papule, pustule, or cyst. Inflamed blemishes occur when the follicle, or pore, becomes engorged with excess oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria. The pore swells, causing a break in the follicle wall. If the rupture occurs near the skin's surface, the lesion is usually minor and heals quickly. More serious lesions arise when there is a deep break in the follicle wall. The infected material spills out into the dermis and destroys healthy skin tissue.
We've all heard the foods that allegedly cause acne—chocolate, fried foods, pizza, caffeine, nuts. But Dr. Schultz reminds us that in large, statistically significant studies, these have not been proven to cause zits, but there are always exceptions. "If you break out when you eat chocolate, don't eat chocolate." Same with dairy, which again, has been shown in some cases to have an effect but no concrete cause-and-effect relationship exists.
Chemical peels. Chemical peels can reduce the appearance of shallow acne scars and post-inflammatory hyper-pigmentation around a healed acne lesion. A chemical peel may be administered by a doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner, or spa aesthetician and involves applying a chemical to your skin to remove its outer layer, giving it a smoother, more even appearance. Depending on the strength of the acid used, you may experience redness and peeling for a few days afterward.
"If you occupy the area [under the skin] with a cyst, it destroys fat around it. Once the cyst goes away, the loss causes indentation," Dr. Karolak explains. A boxcar scar is a depression that has hidden scar tissue, which acts like an accordion pulling the scar downward. Subsicion is one solution for these deeper scars. Subsicion uses a sharp needle to go under the surface and break up that scar tissue. Then, you can fill it in with fillers made specifically for acne scars like Bellafill. Or you can do a fat transfer. "One of my favorite treatments for volume loss is fat transfer, which allows me to take inject a patient's own body fat instead of synthetic filler," says Dr. Karolak. Another treatment for boxcar scars is punch excision where the indented area of the scar is removed and the edges are pulled together with a suture. These treatments are often followed up with a collagen-boosting laser treatment.
"Fluctuation in hormones, such as before one's menstrual cycle, is the main cause," explains dermatologist Julia Tzu, M.D., of Wall Street Dermatology. Specifically, androgens (male hormones) like testosterone. This usually rears its ugly head in the form of deep (painful) cystic acne around the chin, neck, and back, says dermatologist Rebecca Kazin, M.D., F.A.A.D., of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and the Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology.

Acne scar treatment: “Rolling scars can be treated with microfat injections followed by microneedling with platelet-rich plasma (PRP),” says Dr. Imber. Microneedling creates tiny wounds or pinpricks in the skin. The body’s natural, controlled healing process then kicks in to boost internal collagen production. Microneedling is also a great acne scar treatment because it opens up channels within the skin that give PRP—the healing factors in your own blood—and skin care products direct access to deeper layers of the skin where they’re needed most. PRP is created by taking some of your blood, isolating the platelet-rich plasma, which contains proteins and other growth factors, and injecting it back into the scar. “The objective is to build up the collagen layer under the depression in order to raise it to the level of the surrounding skin,” Dr. Imber says. You’ll likely need multiple treatments, but the results are worth it. This approach is backed up by a new study in the January 2017 issue of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, which found that fat plus PRP improve depressed scars alone and in combination with laser skin resurfacing. What’s more, the treatment improved the social life and relationships of people with scarring, the study showed. These are the innocent habits that practically guarantee your acne will scar.

Get at least eight hours of sleep. Sleeping kills two birds with one stone, as it helps to relax your body as well as detoxify it. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, chances are your skin hasn’t had the time or ability to renew its skin cells. Regulate your sleep cycle by going to bed at a consistent time every night and sleeping for a minimum of eight hours at least.[12]
Similar to the above natural acne remedies, these acne treatments can be inexpensive and worth giving a try. Best of all, these use products you probably already have in your household, like apple cider vinegar and toothpaste. Use home remedies for acne with caution if you have cystic acne, open sores, or inflammatory acne, which are best treated with medical supervision.
Use a toner after cleansing. After you wash your face, exfoliate, or apply a face mask, apply a toner to the entirety of your face. Toners work to tighten pores making it less likely that dirt and oil will become trapped in them. Buy acne toners at a local drugstore, or use witch hazel or apple cider vinegar dabbed on with a cotton ball. Don’t rinse toners after application - allow them to stay on your skin.
This might annoy your mom, but using your fingers to chat could save your skin. Just think of all those oils, all that bacteria and all those germs on your iPhone. When you hold it up to your face, it’s a little like rubbing your cheek on a New York City sidewalk. {Shudder.} When you need to talk, wipe your phone with a cleansing wipe or go hands-free.
Topical (external) applications: Antibacterial cleansers come in the form of gels, creams, and lotions that are applied to the affected area. The active ingredients that kill surface bacteria include benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, and resorcinol. Some brands promoted on the Internet and cable TV (such as ProActiv) are much more costly than identical and sometimes more potent products one can buy in the drugstore.
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