"Overwashing your face can make acne worse," Dr. Kazin explains. Cleansing more than twice a day is too much and can just dry out skin, "which can cause [it] to produce more oil to overcompensate." Your Clarisonic addiction may not be helping either. "It helps remove all makeup and helps your cleanser work better, but I worry about the coarse ones. It's almost like giving yourself microdermabrasion twice a day, which can cause a breakout," says Dr. Kazin. Dr. Schultz seconds that: "Anything that rubs skin will, to a small extent, promote acne." That includes a grainy or gritty cleanser, too. Try these two gentle face washes instead: Phace Bioactive Detoxifying Gel Cleanser or Frank Body Creamy Face Cleanser.
Keloid bumps are generally discolored and raised. These scars form when the body tries to recover from the inflammation caused by cystic acne. According to Dr. Sobel, you can get a keloid if too many fibroblasts or dermal cells are produced during the healing process. The first step in treatment is to flatten the bump with a shot of cortisone. Then, you can follow up with other treatments like laser or retinol to even out the skin tone.
While SPF is a must, some sunscreens can trigger breakouts. You want to look for oil-free and non-comedogenic formulas that won't clog pores,” says Karen Hammerman, MD, from Schweiger Dermatology. Options from brands like Elta MD and Peter Thomas Roth, which are recommended by the pros, are specifically tested on acneic skin so you can get your dose of SPF without having to worry about clogged pores.
With its natural inflammation-fighting properties, a 5 percent solution of tea tree oil is less harsh than a 5 percent benzoyl peroxide solution and can be just as effective against acne, though it may clear up a little less quickly. Mix a few drops of tea tree oil with between 20 and 40 drops of witch hazel, then use a cotton swab to apply. Try this remedy up to twice a day; more could dry your skin and make the acne worse.
As you go about treating acne, it's important to remember that all acne isn't the same. What works really well for one kind of pimple might not work at all for another. You want to use the type of acne treatment that targets your particular kind of acne. If you use the wrong treatment you might even make your breakouts worse. The first step in how to get rid of acne is understanding what kind of acne you have—read on to learn about blackheads, white heads, small red bumps, hormonal acne and cystic acne, and how to best treat each.
If you’ve made a concerted effort with over-the-counter regimens and/or diet and still aren’t seeing results, a dermatologist is absolutely worth it. There are many levels of care: Prescription retinoids (Retin A, Tazorac, Differin et al) and/or topical antibiotics are the mildest, along with blue-light treatments like Isolaze, which kill bacteria and clear pores, with virtually no downtime. Light lasers like Clear and Brilliant can clear pores and treat the red and brown tones left by old acne lesions. “Some patients think they’ve got a severe problem, when they really only have a few pimples, surrounded by red and brown marks from old breakouts,” notes Anolik. Oral antibiotics represent a more aggressive (and unsustainable long-term) solution; birth control pills and hormone-mitigating medications like Spironalactone and Deldactone can get many more-severe patients’ acne under control. Most aggressive is Accutane; while it can be severely drying and can cause birth defects if taken during pregnancy, it represents a cure for truly-severe acne cases, says Anolik. “Used correctly, it is something of a miracle for people who’ve tried everything and failed,” he says.
Minocycline is available in generic form or the branded formulation, Solodyn. The most-prescribed oral antibiotic acne medication for moderate to severe inflammatory acne like cystic acne, Solodyn is a minocycline like those mentioned above. However, it comes in an extended release formula that allows it to work to clear skin over the course of the day with just one daily dose.
"Overwashing your face can make acne worse," Dr. Kazin explains. Cleansing more than twice a day is too much and can just dry out skin, "which can cause [it] to produce more oil to overcompensate." Your Clarisonic addiction may not be helping either. "It helps remove all makeup and helps your cleanser work better, but I worry about the coarse ones. It's almost like giving yourself microdermabrasion twice a day, which can cause a breakout," says Dr. Kazin. Dr. Schultz seconds that: "Anything that rubs skin will, to a small extent, promote acne." That includes a grainy or gritty cleanser, too. Try these two gentle face washes instead: Phace Bioactive Detoxifying Gel Cleanser or Frank Body Creamy Face Cleanser.
Back acne (sometimes called “bacne") is a potentially embarrassing and sometimes painful condition where clogged hair follicles on the back cause pimples and blackheads. Back acne can be caused by the same factors as other types of acne: diet, hormones, certain medications, genetics, or any combination thereof. But when you're considering how to get rid of back acne, also remember that most people have their back covered the majority of the day. The clothing we wear matters, and the way in which we wash the skin on our back are key for clear skin, the whole body over. Learn more about common back acne causes, the best acne products for your body, and how to prevent acne on the back from returning in this section.
"I have seen many patients develop a tolerance to prescription acne treatments, and when they stop working, it’s devastating. Treating acne demands a more holistic approach that includes lifestyle, nutrition, and advances in topical skincare. I developed Outsmart Acne™ Clarifying Treatment to be used as part of a whole-person regimen to help skin stay consistently clear."—Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD
21. You might try a prescription. Topical antibiotics are available only with a prescription and work by killing the bacteria on your skin that cause acne, and by reducing inflammation. Some examples of topical antibiotics are erythromycin and clindamycin. Your doctor may prescribe you them in conjunction with another topical treatment such as one containing benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid such as Retin-A.
A benzoyl peroxide cream (2.5 percent strength) is a good choice for adolescents experiencing red or inflamed breakouts that aren't getting better with medicated cleansers. Benzoyl peroxide is a very common and inexpensive acne treatment cream that can be found over-the-counter in the skin care aisle. Benzoyl peroxide kills the bacteria that cause pimples and is highly successful in treating mild cases of acne.
Fractional laser treatment is less invasive than ablative laser treatment, as it targets only a fraction of the skin at a time. Fractional lasers penetrate the top skin layers, where its light energy stimulates collagen production and resurfaces the top layer of the epidermis. Treatments typically last between 15 and 45 minutes and effects become visible in 1 to 3 weeks.
Those who consume a bevy of seafood, seaweed, and iodized salt experience high iodine levels. These iodine levels have also been purported to trigger acne flare ups. Word spread about iodine’s potential for causing skin issues in the 1960s, and it’s had a bad rap ever since. However, recent studies have fought against this pervasive thought, as some studies have seen no difference between acne in those who were given iodine and those who weren’t. It’s important to take these studies with a grain of salt, and understand that depleting your diet of iodine can have negative effects on holistic health. Iodine is essential for proper thyroid function, and is responsible for the manufacture of T3 and T4 thyroid hormones and it’s important to maintain proper levels of iodine in your diet.

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
There are a number of mild chemical peels available over the counter, but acne scar removal requires a stronger peel typically administered by a doctor or dermatologist. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peels are slightly stronger than alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) peels and may be used for acne scar treatment. The strongest type, phenol peels, may cause significant swelling and require up to two weeks of recovery time at home. Neither are recommended for people with active severe acne.
If you're looking for suggestions on how to get rid of acne overnight, using toothpaste for acne spot treatment has probably come up. But does it work? Toothpaste contains ingredients like baking soda, alcohol, hydrogen peroxide and menthol that can dry out acne. However, some experts warn that using toothpaste for acne can actually cause over-drying and even skin peeling, so it should be used with caution. Here's how:

Photodynamic therapy is a new acne treatment. It begins with light microdermabrasion. This is used to remove dead skin cells on the face's surface. Then, an acid is put on the skin for 30 to 60 minutes. After this period, the acid is taken off. Lastly, the skin is treated with a laser. This treatment is still being researched, but seems to give positive long-term results.
A quick primer on light therapy: red light is known to promote circulation and reduce inflammation while blue light targets acne-causing bacteria and makes oil glads produce less sebum. What this mask helped me most with was preventing new breakouts from forming on top of the cluster already invading my chin. It stopped what was previously a never-ending cycle of acne.
Hormone changes as an adult. The menstrual cycle is one of the most common acne triggers. Acne lesions tend to form a few days before the cycle begins and go away after the cycle is completed. Other hormone changes, such as pregnancy and menopause, improve acne in some women. But some women have worse acne during these times. Stopping use of birth control pills can play a role as well.
Contrary to popular belief, acne isn't caused by a harmful diet, poor hygiene, or an uncontrolled sex drive. The simple truth is that heredity and hormones are behind most forms of acne. Swearing off chocolate or scrubbing your face 10 times a day won't change your predisposition to this unsightly, sometimes painful, and often embarrassing skin problem.
Isotretinoin has a high risk of inducing birth defects if taken by pregnant women. Women of childbearing age who take isotretinoin need two negative pregnancy tests (blood or urine) before starting the drug, monthly tests while they take it, and another after they are done. Those who are sexually active must use two forms of contraception, one of which is usually the oral contraceptive pill. Isotretinoin leaves the body completely when treatment is done; women must be sure to avoid pregnancy for one month after therapy is stopped. There is, however, no risk to childbearing after that time.
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