Fillers. A substance such as collagen, hyaluronic acid, or fat can be used to "fill out" certain types of acne scars, especially those that have resulted in a depressed appearance of the skin. Since fillers are eventually absorbed into your skin, you will have to repeat filler injections, usually every few months, depending on the type of product used. There is no downtime for recovery from this treatment.
Yet another study took a look at the difference in rates of acne in first-degree relatives between patients and controls. The study used 204 acne patients, and 144 non-acne controls. Their study determined that having a first-degree relative who suffers from acne increases the risk of getting acne by four times. Genes play a role in several ways: firstly, they contribute to skin sensitivity. Acne-prone skin is more susceptible to oil production, and tends to shed and regenerate skin cells faster. Those prone to acne also exhibit strong inflammatory responses to skin irritants and bacteria in comparison to those who don’t have issues with acne.
Laser treatment may cause some discomfort. While most patients are able to endure the procedure, ice packs and topical anesthetic cream can help alleviate the discomfort. Multiple treatments are typically necessary, and most insurances do not cover the procedure. Doctors recommend treatments in three- to six-week intervals; during this time, sun avoidance is necessary. Review risk, benefits, and alternatives with a physician prior to treatment. Combine laser treatments with photodynamic therapy (light-activated chemical using Levulan) for more noticeable results.
Understanding why you break out requires consideration of a variety of aspects. There are many underlying reasons for acne breakouts, but most pimples are caused by fluctuations in hormone levels. During puberty, the increase in androgens (male hormones) causes the adrenal glands to go into overdrive. This triggers the production of sebum within the sebaceous glands. The more sebum produced, the easier it is for hair follicles to become clogged. When the follicle becomes blocked, oil can’t leave the pore, collecting dead skin cells that would have otherwise sloughed off and hanging onto bacteria called p. acnes. These hormonal fluctuations can arise at other times in life, including menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause.

This potent serum uses a blend of restorative, antioxidant ingredients to promote skin healing, which is what acne scars need. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a time-released acid that simultaneously stimulates collagen synthesis and promotes wound healing. Retinol works similarly in this formulation, while zinc sulfate is as an anti-inflammatory, and aurbtin helps manage hyperpigmentation.
Diet. Studies indicate that certain dietary factors, including skim milk and carbohydrate-rich foods — such as bread, bagels and chips — may worsen acne. Chocolate has long been suspected of making acne worse. A small study of 14 men with acne showed that eating chocolate was related to a worsening of symptoms. Further study is needed to examine why this happens and whether people with acne would benefit from following specific dietary restrictions.
Common knowledge would dictate that most people are aware that certain foods, and in turn, the nutrients they contain, can be beneficial for specific body parts. For example, healthy bones require calcium and vitamin D; our hearts function better when we eat certain seafood that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. However, this does beg the question as to what food promotes healthy skin?
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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