Lasers. Your dermatologist can use a laser to remove the outer layer of your skin, contour areas of acne scars, or lighten redness around healed acne lesions. Various types of lasers are used, depending on whether the acne scar is raised or flat. More than one laser treatment may be required and, depending on the laser used, you may need to several days to heal.
While SPF is a must, some sunscreens can trigger breakouts. You want to look for oil-free and non-comedogenic formulas that won't clog pores,” says Karen Hammerman, MD, from Schweiger Dermatology. Options from brands like Elta MD and Peter Thomas Roth, which are recommended by the pros, are specifically tested on acneic skin so you can get your dose of SPF without having to worry about clogged pores.
9. You're not releasing pent-up stress properly. Stress triggers acne and acne results in more stress, so it's a very vicious cycle. Basically, when you're under pressure, your skin produces stress hormones, including cortisol, that can stimulate your oil glands to make testosterone that then increases oil production and clogs pores. (Tip via Dr. Downie.)

Unfortunately, if you have a scar on the skin then it will for lifelong but the good news is that you can reduce its size, color and appearance on the skin by lightening them up to the point of undetectable. In general, there are 5 types of acne scars like an ice pick, boxcar, rolling, hyperpigmentation, and keloid scars. So, consult your dermatologist for proper treatment.
Ablative lasers deliver an intense wavelength of light to the skin, removing thin outer layers of the skin (epidermis). In addition, collagen production is stimulated in the underlying layer (the dermis). Patients are typically numbed with local anesthetic and the ablation is done as an outpatient procedure. CO2 and erbium are the ablative lasers most often used for acne scar treatment.
A new, big trend in acne treatments over the past year has been stick-on dots. Some brands, like Nexcare Acne Absorbing Covers, aren't medicated; instead, the clear, absorbent, sterile patches (which feel more like gel than a Band-Aid) dry out the zit like a sponge. Bonus: They'll keep you from picking at it! Despite the fact that they contain no actual medicine, the Nexcare covers have a perfect five-star rating on drugstore.com and a cult following. Meanwhile, many brands do medicate their acne dots, like Peter Thomas Roth's new Acne-Clear Invisible Dots. These invisible stick-on patches contain salicylic acid, tea tree oil, and hyaluronic acid to disinfect and clear clogged pores.
So good!...Holy grain...It says to apply to a clean face up to 3 times a day, but I only use it twice because I have to leave my make up on... I swear it takes away the biggest/reddest bumps ever!...I have stubborn acne flairups once a month that get huge and stay for over a week and with this twice a day on clean skin it keeps my blemish small and it goes away in 2 days!!
So if popping pimples doesn't cause scarring, what does? Long-lasting scars typically turn up after a recurring bout with cystic acne. Cystic acne is a breakout that burrows deep into the skin. These red, painful nodules occur when clogged pores are filled with pus and bacteria, which causes inflammation. Cystic breakouts are often tied to an internal fluctuation of hormones like testosterone (that's why they're common during puberty, monthly menstruation, and perimenopause). "If there is a cyst in the skin, it's going to cause a scar the longer it sits there because pus or bacteria deeper inside the pores cause surrounding inflammation," says Dr. Karolak. And as a result, the inflammation affects the collagen production as well as the fat stores under the skin, creating a visible scar on the surface.

Take an extra five minutes before hopping on the treadmill to completely wash your face and remove your makeup to minimize the risk of breakouts. "Sweat is released through visible pores in the skin," says dermatologist Dr. Janelle Vega. "When makeup covers those pores, that barrier doesn't allow the sweat to make it to the surface of the skin, which can lead to clogged pores. The trapped debris and bacteria are a perfect breeding ground for acne bumps and zits."

A recent study has found a difference between strains of acne bacteria, which could have a significant impact on acne treatment down the road. This study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, found that these strains play a role in the severity and frequency of developing pimples. One particular strain of P. acnes was found among study participants that exhibited few symptoms of acne. Researchers came to the conclusion that this “good” strain of bacteria features a natural defense mechanism that fights back bacteria which might infect the cell. Researchers are hopeful that this discovery will help dermatologists better and more accurately prescribe effective acne treatment in the future, and reduce the severity of acne by ridding the skin of bad acne bacteria while preserving the good. 

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.


A quick primer on light therapy: red light is known to promote circulation and reduce inflammation while blue light targets acne-causing bacteria and makes oil glads produce less sebum. What this mask helped me most with was preventing new breakouts from forming on top of the cluster already invading my chin. It stopped what was previously a never-ending cycle of acne.
I can't disagree with much of this. I was almost half expecting some wild remedy. :) When I was younger I had very bad cystic acne. I took tetracycline, minocycline, doxicycline, I used topicals like Retin-A, Cleocin-T, salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide. I began using the Citrus Clear products on a regular, daily basis. Also I never touch my hands to my face, and the result has been acne free. NOt even an occasional pimple.
What you can do differently: For starters, stop going to tanning beds. Period. And if you are in the sun, make sure to slather on a titanium dioxide- or zinc-based sunscreen (these are natural sun protectants and their formulations usually contain fewer chemicals, so they won't break you out as easily), and wear a sun hat or ball cap to shield your facial skin from harsh rays.
Genetics can also have an effect on acne breakouts, and may be the reason some people are acne-prone while others are not. One of the top cited studies took a look at 458 pairs of identical twins and 1099 pairs of fraternal twins to study acne prevalence. They found that genes explained a significant 81 percent of the difference in acne prevalence, while the other 19 percent was explained by non-shared environmental factors. 

Moderate to moderately severe acne. This type of acne consists of several whiteheads, blackheads, papules and pustules that cover from ¼ to ¾ of the face and/or other parts of the body. It can be treated with antibiotic lotions or gels, as well as retinoic acid. Retinoic acid is an altered form of vitamin A. It helps prevent whiteheads and blackheads. Your doctor may also prescribe an antibiotic pill, such as erythromycin. If you take birth control pills to prevent pregnancy, antibiotics can affect how well they work. Be sure to use a second method of birth control with the pill, such as a condom. Retinoic acid and antibiotic pills can make the skin sensitive to the sun. So, wear sunscreen and stay in the shade while using them.
Physicians commonly prescribe oral antibiotics to patients with moderate rosacea. Tetracycline (Sumycin), doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea, Adoxa, Atridox), and minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin), are oral antibiotics commonly prescribed are presumed to work by reducing inflammation. A newer low-dose doxycycline preparation called Oracea (40 mg once a day) treats rosacea. The dose may be initially high and then be tapered to maintenance levels. Patients should consider common side effects and potential risks before taking oral antibiotics.
When you're feeling anxious, your body produces more of the stress hormone cortisol. Excess levels can signal acne to worsen, explains Lauren Eckert Ploch, a dermatologist with Georgia Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center in Augusta, GA. Light an aromatherapy candle. The dim flickering light, plus the soothing scents of eucalyptus and mint, instantly creates a chill environment.
"If you occupy the area [under the skin] with a cyst, it destroys fat around it. Once the cyst goes away, the loss causes indentation," Dr. Karolak explains. A boxcar scar is a depression that has hidden scar tissue, which acts like an accordion pulling the scar downward. Subsicion is one solution for these deeper scars. Subsicion uses a sharp needle to go under the surface and break up that scar tissue. Then, you can fill it in with fillers made specifically for acne scars like Bellafill. Or you can do a fat transfer. "One of my favorite treatments for volume loss is fat transfer, which allows me to take inject a patient's own body fat instead of synthetic filler," says Dr. Karolak. Another treatment for boxcar scars is punch excision where the indented area of the scar is removed and the edges are pulled together with a suture. These treatments are often followed up with a collagen-boosting laser treatment.
Can you get rid of acne scars? Yes, yes you can. Red residue, deep craters, raised bumps and dark spots are no match for your determined willpower. Put your pimpled past behind you and start seeking out these ingredients for how to get rid of acne marks. There are many ways to get rid of acne scars and what works for someone might not be the right solution for you. Don’t give up; how to get rid of pimple scars is not a one-size-fits-all answer. Stick with it, and don’t let your scarring stand between you and the confidence you deserve.

How big of a scar you'll be left with after a blemish (if any at all) depends on the depth of the breakout, Schlessinger says. "As our pores become engorged with oil and form a blemish, the pore may swell and collapse the follicle wall," he says. "The depth of the resulting lesion determines the severity of the scar. Shallow lesions usually heal quickly and leave little-to-no scarring, while deeper lesions spread to nearby tissue, causing a more pronounced scar."
A recent study has found a difference between strains of acne bacteria, which could have a significant impact on acne treatment down the road. This study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, found that these strains play a role in the severity and frequency of developing pimples. One particular strain of P. acnes was found among study participants that exhibited few symptoms of acne. Researchers came to the conclusion that this “good” strain of bacteria features a natural defense mechanism that fights back bacteria which might infect the cell. Researchers are hopeful that this discovery will help dermatologists better and more accurately prescribe effective acne treatment in the future, and reduce the severity of acne by ridding the skin of bad acne bacteria while preserving the good. 
Drugs: Some medications may cause or worsen acne, such as those containing iodides, bromides, or oral or injected steroids (either the medically prescribed prednisone [Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred] or the steroids that bodybuilders or athletes sometimes take). Other drugs that can cause or aggravate acne are anticonvulsant medications and lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid). Most cases of acne, however, are not drug related.
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