When it comes to skin care, we're not usually ones for hard and fast rules. Everyone has unique skin types, skin tones, lifestyles, and genetic histories that make it impossible to have a single piece of one-size-fits-all advice. It can take years — and dozens of trips to the dermatologist — to discover how to treat acne effectively on your unique skin. But here at Teen Vogue, we've pretty much made it our life mission to figure out the best tips from the pros to point you in the right direction. They've seen it all and won't recommend it unless it's backed up by experience and science,.
Exfoliating cleansers and masks: A variety of mild scrubs, exfoliants, and masks can be used. These products may contain salicylic acid in a concentration that makes it a very mild peeling agent. These products remove the outer layer of the skin and thus open pores. Products containing glycolic or alpha hydroxy acids are also gentle skin exfoliants.
Severe acne. Severe acne consists of deep cysts, redness, swelling, extreme damage to the skin and scarring. You should see a dermatologist to care for this type of acne. Scarring can be prevented with appropriate treatments. Your dermatologist can prescribe oral antibiotics and oral contraceptives. Large inflamed cysts can be treated with an injection of a drug that lessens the redness, swelling, and irritation, and promotes healing.

Yes, it is possible to lessen, if not completely eliminate, your acne troubles with food. The key is knowing which foods help -- i.e antioxidant rich, fiber packed, protein loaded, vitamin soaked, healthy fat filled foods (that was quite a mouthful, wasn't it?) -- as well as which foods are really, really BAD for acne; i.e. sugar loaded, preservative packed, salt soaked, unhealthy fat filled foods.
If you have this, you’re not alone – it can affect many people! Like face acne, bacne can form when your pores get clogged by excess oil and dead skin cells, allowing bacteria to grow. Sometimes, wearing tight clothes and using heavy backpacks can irritate the skin and make bacne worse. You can treat it the same way you would treat acne on your face.

"Leafy green vegetables and other brightly-colored fruit and vegetables which are rich in antioxidants and nutrients dampen inflammation and improve skin quality (studies have shown acne patients have higher oil production and lower antioxidant levels)," says Dr. Weiser. "Limit intake of dairy products, which can contain hormones and antibiotics that can worsen acne breakouts." Other skin-boosting superfoods include eggs, nuts, legumes, and quinoa.
Derived from the Melaleuca alternifolia plant of Australia, tea tree oil is an excellent antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral essential oil. As such, not only for acne scars, tea tree oil is, in fact, one of the best remedies for acne too. As far as scars are concerned, this oil is most beneficial in healing the hypertrophic scars that are generally raised and red, such as those we get after burn injury or a surgery. Raised acne scars too are not very uncommon. So if you have such raised or hypertrophic acne scars, you can effectively use tea tree oil to heal them. Tea tree oil, due to its anti-inflammatory effects would definitely help you in getting rid of such acne scars. This oil is also hydrating. It provides moisture and helps hydrate the scar which gradually diminishes the scar and make it disappear.
Treatment of acne scars: For those patients whose acne has gone away but left them with permanent scarring, several options are available. These include surgical procedures to elevate deep, depressed acne scars and laser resurfacing to smooth out shallow acne scars. Newer forms of laser resurfacing ("fractional resurfacing") are less invasive and heal faster than older methods, although results are less complete and the procedures may need to be repeated three or more times. These treatments can help, but they are never completely successful at eliminating acne scars.
17. Less is more. Too many products can irritate and too many steps may tempt you to skip. When it comes to your skin, more is definitely NOT more. In other words, trying a bunch of different remedies at once won't boost your chances of making the zit disappear — more likely, it'll just wreak havoc on your skin and turn a teeny-tiny pimple into a red, blotchy mess.
To get rid of acne, wash your face with a pH balanced cleanser twice a day to eliminate acne-causing bacteria. You should also exfoliate your face at least once a week with a physical or chemical exfoliant which will remove dead skin cells that clog pores. Applying a benzoyl peroxide cream to your acne before you go to bed can also help get rid of breakouts.
Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
Rosacea may affect the eyes. Not everyone with rosacea has eye problems. A complication of advanced rosacea, known as ocular rosacea, affects the eyes. About half of all people with rosacea report feeling burning, dryness, and irritation of the tissue lining of the eyes (conjunctivitis). These individuals may also experience redness of the eyelids and light sensitivity. Often the eye symptoms may go completely unnoticed and not be a major concern for the individual. Many times, the physician or ophthalmologist may be the first one to notice the eye symptoms. Untreated, ocular rosacea may cause a serious complication that can damage the cornea permanently damaging vision, called rosacea keratitis. An ophthalmologist can assist in a proper eye evaluation and prescribe rosacea eyedrops. Oral antibiotics may be useful to treat skin and eye rosacea.
Exercise regularly. Exercising does a number of things to help reduce your acne. It releases endorphins which lower stress levels and therefore reduce oil-production and also makes you sweat which cleans out dead skin cells. Try exercising on a daily basis for a minimum of thirty minutes to help reduce your acne not only on your face, but also on your chest, shoulders, and back; which is where the term "bacne" comes from.
When it comes to scarring, many doctors will tell you that prevention is key. Wearing sunscreen daily is critical, says Heidi Waldorf, a New York City-based dermatologist, and this one from Elta MD is her favorite. "It contains niacinamide, which reduces inflammation, and it's oil-free, which makes it excellent for daily use for acne-prone patients," she says.
Moderate to moderately severe acne. This type of acne consists of several whiteheads, blackheads, papules and pustules that cover from ¼ to ¾ of the face and/or other parts of the body. It can be treated with antibiotic lotions or gels, as well as retinoic acid. Retinoic acid is an altered form of vitamin A. It helps prevent whiteheads and blackheads. Your doctor may also prescribe an antibiotic pill, such as erythromycin. If you take birth control pills to prevent pregnancy, antibiotics can affect how well they work. Be sure to use a second method of birth control with the pill, such as a condom. Retinoic acid and antibiotic pills can make the skin sensitive to the sun. So, wear sunscreen and stay in the shade while using them.
It is a myth that women get acne because they don't wash enough. Too much washing or scrubbing the skin harshly can make acne worse. And washing away surface oils doesn't do much to prevent or cure acne, because it forms under the skin. The best way to clean the face is to gently wash it twice a day with a mild soap or cleanser. Be careful to remove make-up without harsh scrubbing.

Rolling scars can look like little saucers, giving the skin a wavy texture. Lasers that resurface the skin are Dr. Karolak's top treatment pick for this type of scar, and Dr. Sobel agrees. "Many scars can be improved with lasers such as the matrix CO2, which remove the outer layers of skin, burning away the scar tissue and stimulate new collagen production," he says. "Non-ablative lasers such as the Fraxel can help activate the production of collagen without damaging the surface of the skin." Keep in mind, that these laser treatments can take a bit of recovery time and require multiple treatments to see results. For a quicker solution, your dermatologist can plump the bowl-like scar with fillers like Juvederm, Restylane, or Bellafill.

11. You need to clean your phone, too. If you're seeing pimples on your cheeks or anywhere near the area where you hold your phone, they may be from those hour-long convos with your crush. Your phone picks up lots of dirt and bacteria (from your hands, your bag, the kitchen counter), which can then get transferred to your face when you're chatting on the phone. Wipe your screen with an anti-bacterial wipe often to get rid of dirt and germs.


Even if battling zits is a distant memory, filed away with high-school gym class and algebra tests, acne marks and scars can annoyingly linger long after pimples are gone. “If someone gets a very large pimple or cyst, the natural healing process of the skin will create a scar,” says David Avram, M.D., of Heights Dermatology and Laser. “The more intense the inflammation, the more likely it will leave a scar.”
What you can do differently: Instead of dousing your zit with a spot treatment, apply a dab of OTC 1 percent hydrocortisone cream, like Aveeno One Percent Hydrocortisone Anti-Itch Cream, onto the spot two to three times during the day to take down the inflammation and redness. Then conceal it by simply covering it up with a concealer, like Clinique Even Better Compact Makeup, which has antibacterial ingredients to keep the formula bacteria-free and your face clear.
This potent serum uses a blend of restorative, antioxidant ingredients to promote skin healing, which is what acne scars need. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a time-released acid that simultaneously stimulates collagen synthesis and promotes wound healing. Retinol works similarly in this formulation, while zinc sulfate is as an anti-inflammatory, and aurbtin helps manage hyperpigmentation.
This revolutionary treatment is designed to clear skin, help control acne pimples and revitalize fatigued, stressed and dull skin. A 5-step treatment, with a unique Oxygen Complex and Patented Anti-Microbial Peptides, purifies and deeply hydrates to restore the skin’s natural radiance and glow. The skin becomes luminous, moisture-balanced and younger looking.
Pimples are raised red spots with a white center that develop when blocked hair follicles become inflamed or infected with bacteria. Blockages and inflammation that develop deep inside hair follicles produce cystlike lumps beneath the surface of your skin. Other pores in your skin, which are the openings of the sweat glands, aren't usually involved in acne.
×