Acne refers to pimples, blemishes, blackheads, zits or whiteheads. While this problem is commonly associated with teenagers, many adults suffer from acne as well. Stress, hormones, environmental factors and more can lead to acne problems, causing individuals embarrassment and slashing their confidence. Outlined below are tips for eliminating acne once and for all so you can have healthy, glowing skin.
Can’t use the good stuff: The best medications for clearing acne include topical retinoids like Differin and Retin-A. The strong chemicals that are used in exfoliants can cause severe inflammation and sun irritation when combined with these medications. This means that you will have to choose between facials or proper medications. The choice is yours.
Rena Levi is known for her sensitivity towards clients with severe acne and problem skin. In 1968 she moved from Israel to the U.S. and studied with Christine Valmy at the European Esthetic Skincare Institute. In 1975, she opened the Rena Levi Skin Care Salon in New York City. In 1980, she moved to Albuquerque, NM, where she managed the skin care center for Eleganza Salon and further developed and refined her practice. It was there that she became well known for her ability to treat what many considered impossible skin, while also teaching budding estheticians and skin practitioners at the same time, including the then-president of the New Mexico Board of Cosmetology. Here, Levi shares with us one of her most popular facial protocol treatments for treating clients with moderate to severe acne.

Our skin contains millions of small sebaceous glands underneath the surface. These glands excrete an oil, called sebum, that helps to keep our skin smooth and supple. This oil is released via pores, which are small holes on the surface of the skin, which is also where hairs grow out of. When the body produces a lot of sebum, the skin can feel oily and these pores can become clog. It is when these pores become clogged that germs and bacteria can thrive and grow. The result – pimples.

Sure, we’ve all heard that toothpaste or rubbing alcohol can help dry out a zit, but many DIY treatments aren't solutions for how to treat acne. In fact, applying toothpaste or rubbing alcohol are more likely to cause irritation and dryness than treat the actual pimple. Instead, stick with topical over-the-counter and prescription spot treatments with salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide that are specially made to target pimples, says Dr. Hammerman. For an all-natural spot treatment, she suggests dabbing tea tree oil on the area a few times a day with a cotton ball.
If you’ve exhausted this list of helpful ingredients while researching how to get rid of acne scarring, it might be time to head to the dermatologist and see what medical treatments are available for your complexion. But before you go shelling out the big bucks on expensive procedures, test out these scientifically-backed ingredients used to get rid of acne scars. Give your product a bit of time to do its work before tossing it out and moving to the next one. Patience and perseverance are key here, so try not to feel jaded or dejected during your journey. A beautiful complexion awaits beneath those scars, and using these active agents can help you seek it out.
29. Antibiotics are an option. Oral antibiotics are usually used for moderate to severe acne, especially on the back or chest, and kill bacteria in your skin pores. The ones most commonly used are tetracycline and erythromycin. Like all antibiotics, they can cause yeast infections as well as more severe side effects and can interfere with the effectiveness of birth control pills. They can also cause increased sun sensitivity, so you'll need to be extra careful when going outside and use SPF daily. For more extreme cases, your doctor may suggest Isotretinoin (Accutane), which is used in moderate to severe cases of acne when nothing else works, but can have more extreme side effects.

I couldn't just let the worst breakout ever live on without a visit to the dermatologist, so I went to BeautyRx founder Dr. Neal Schultz. He gave me this incredible "Z Stick" spot treatment that contains mild cortisone (the same substance derms use to inject pimples to make them die down in 24 to 48 hours), and Clindamycin, an antibiotic. I applied this every morning and evening to all my spots and it acted like an extra layer of armor against further inflammation. Sadly, it's prescription-only and/or only available through Dr. Schultz's practice in New York—but he's working on making one for consumers.

You can apply all the topicals you want, but unfortunately, most treatments you'll find at the drugstore won't help with acne scars, Hellman says. However, she notes that derma rollers (at-home microneedling devices) may help with acne scarring. If you're on a tight budget, that should be your first stop. You can get one on Amazon for less than $20. (Use yours once a week followed by a Vitamin C serum for best results—here's how to pick the best ones.)

In occasional cases, patients may use short-term topical cortisone (steroid) preparations of minimal strength to reduce local inflammation. Some mild steroids include desonide lotion or hydrocortisone 1% cream applied sparingly once or twice a day just to the irritated areas. There is a risk of causing a rosacea flare by using topical steroids. Prolonged use of topical steroids on the face can also cause irritated skin around the mouth (perioral dermatitis).
But, sometimes a particularly aggressive blemish is truly on a mission to leave its permanent mark. "Acne scars occur when normal tissue in the skin is destroyed and replaced with fibrous tissue. You can think of an acne lesion as a wound. When the damage caused by acne is severe, the body can respond by creating too much tissue or too little tissue. The production of too much tissue forms a keloid or a hypertrophic scar, and too little tissue leads to that depression in the skin, or atrophic scar. The deeper and more inflamed the acne lesion, or the more that it is picked or squeezed, the more likely it is to scar," says Dr. Bowe.
When it comes to skin care, we're not usually ones for hard and fast rules. Everyone has unique skin types, skin tones, lifestyles, and genetic histories that make it impossible to have a single piece of one-size-fits-all advice. It can take years — and dozens of trips to the dermatologist — to discover how to treat acne effectively on your unique skin. But here at Teen Vogue, we've pretty much made it our life mission to figure out the best tips from the pros to point you in the right direction. They've seen it all and won't recommend it unless it's backed up by experience and science,.
A U.K. survey found that on average single men only change their sheets four times a year. And while we certainly hope you are swapping out your linens much more frequently, dirty pillowcases can lead to clogged pores. Nasty as is sounds, bacteria can build up on your bed and your face rubs around on it for a good eight hours a night. Well, that just can’t be good. If your skin is oily, change those sheets (or at least your pillowcases) twice a week. It might be a pain, but isn’t a clear complexion worth it?
Use a toner after cleansing. After you wash your face, exfoliate, or apply a face mask, apply a toner to the entirety of your face. Toners work to tighten pores making it less likely that dirt and oil will become trapped in them. Buy acne toners at a local drugstore, or use witch hazel or apple cider vinegar dabbed on with a cotton ball. Don’t rinse toners after application - allow them to stay on your skin.
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
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