Exercise regularly. Exercising does a number of things to help reduce your acne. It releases endorphins which lower stress levels and therefore reduce oil-production and also makes you sweat which cleans out dead skin cells. Try exercising on a daily basis for a minimum of thirty minutes to help reduce your acne not only on your face, but also on your chest, shoulders, and back; which is where the term "bacne" comes from.
There are breakouts, and then there are breakouts so bad that make me, a grown woman, literally hide under a blanket. The latter happened over a month ago and, as much as I'm here for the growing skin positivity movement, I have to admit my confidence hit an all-time low. I cancelled plans. I stared unhealthily often at a mirror, examining the damage: a colony of seemingly multiplying cystic zits invaded my chin and jawline like never before. How did I get here?
There are simple things you can do on your own to help prevent adult acne and keep it from getting worse. First, wash your skin once or twice a day with a non-drying, non-comedogenic cleanser that won't clog your pores. Look for cosmetic products labeled oil-free, non-comedogenic and non-acnegenic (unlikely to cause acne breakouts). In addition, avoid heavy skin creams or hair products which may aggravate your skin condition.
Moderation and regularity are good things, but not everyone can sleep eight hours, eat three healthy meals per day, and drink plenty of water a day. Probably the most useful lifestyle changes one can make is to never to pick or squeeze pimples. Playing with or popping pimples, no matter how careful and clean one is, nearly always makes bumps stay redder and bumpier longer. People often refer to redness as "scarring," but fortunately, it usually isn't permanent. It's just a mark that takes months to fade if left entirely alone.
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