The birth control pill is another option for women suffering hormonal acne. Four types of birth control pills have been approved by the FDA for use as acne treatment, and all four are combination pills that contain both estrogen and progesterone. Talk to your doctor about how to get rid of acne using birth control and keep in mind that Ortho Tri-cyclen, Estrostep YAZ and Beyaz are the only four brands specifically FDA approved as acne remedies.
Wrap your index finger with cotton, and gently start removing black heads and white heads starting from one side of the face until the skin is clean. For stubborn black heads and white heads, make sure you hold the skin tight with the left hand while using a lancet in the right hand to gently poke the blemish. Using the lancet will make it easier for the white head to come out without bruising the skin; especially with a product like BD Ultrafine. This takes about 10-20 minutes depending on the severity of the acne.
This unique ability of cocoa butter to lock moisture at deeper levels of your skin makes it effective in healing your acne scars. This way, it keeps your skin hydrated. A well-hydrated skin can only regrow skin tissue. New skin tissue in place of scarred ones definitely will give you a blemish free skin. Thus, when you apply cocoa butter daily, you help your damaged skin to get repaired.

Take a small fresh lemon and squeeze out its content juice. Apply the juice directly on the scars using the finger tips or a clean cotton ball, leave it for about 10 minutes and wash it off using cold water. Do this at least once a day for about two to three weeks during after which you can see the scars disappear considerably. If you want, you can also mix some honey with the lemon juice to make it some more effective in reducing of the acne scars.


People who escaped their teen years almost pimple-free may develop persistent adult-onset acne as they get older. Despite the normal increase in androgen levels during puberty, some doctors believe that flare-ups of acne have less to do with androgen levels than with how a person's skin responds to an increase in sebum production or to the bacteria that causes acne. The bacteria Propionibacterium acnes occurs naturally in healthy hair follicles. If too many of them accumulate in plugged follicles, they may secrete enzymes that break down sebum and cause inflammation. Some people are simply more sensitive than others to this reaction. Sebum levels that might cause a pimple or two in one person may result in widespread outbreaks -- or even acute cystic acne -- in another person.
The bad news: There's no secret ingredient or miracle gadget that makes scars totally disappear. Don't get discouraged, though. A lot of what you think is acne scarring is really just hyperpigmentation or erythema (brown or red spots) rather than an actual change in the texture of the skin. Plus, there's a bevy of gels, creams, and treatments that can bring that discoloration down. We asked top dermatologists to recommend the most effective of the bunch.
Washing your face with regular soap is not enough to make acne better. The best face wash for acne is effective at removing oil and dirt, but still gentle enough to use regularly without overdrying your skin. Look for topical acne medication ingredients salicylic acid and/or benzoyl peroxide in your face wash and use gentle, nonabrasive cleansing techniques.
Lasers. Your dermatologist can use a laser to remove the outer layer of your skin, contour areas of acne scars, or lighten redness around healed acne lesions. Various types of lasers are used, depending on whether the acne scar is raised or flat. More than one laser treatment may be required and, depending on the laser used, you may need to several days to heal.
Oral contraceptives: Oral contraceptives (birth control pills), which are low in estrogen to promote safety, have little effect on acne one way or the other. Some contraceptive pills have been shown to have modest effectiveness in treating acne. Those that have been U.S. FDA approved for treating acne are Estrostep, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, and Yaz. Most dermatologists work together with primary care physicians or gynecologists when recommending these medications.
A U.K. survey found that on average single men only change their sheets four times a year. And while we certainly hope you are swapping out your linens much more frequently, dirty pillowcases can lead to clogged pores. Nasty as is sounds, bacteria can build up on your bed and your face rubs around on it for a good eight hours a night. Well, that just can’t be good. If your skin is oily, change those sheets (or at least your pillowcases) twice a week. It might be a pain, but isn’t a clear complexion worth it?
21. You might try a prescription. Topical antibiotics are available only with a prescription and work by killing the bacteria on your skin that cause acne, and by reducing inflammation. Some examples of topical antibiotics are erythromycin and clindamycin. Your doctor may prescribe you them in conjunction with another topical treatment such as one containing benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid such as Retin-A.
You’re a typical hormonal-acne patient if, well past puberty, you’re breaking out around your period, usually in the jawline area, says Anolik. A consistent routine is key—as is enduring a waiting period of two to three months for said routine to work, he continues: “Even powerful prescription treatments can take a few months to really clear things up, and that’s our biggest challenge. People who get frustrated and don’t stick to their treatments get stuck in a cycle of trying and quitting too early, and feeling like nothing works.”
We've all heard the foods that allegedly cause acne—chocolate, fried foods, pizza, caffeine, nuts. But Dr. Schultz reminds us that in large, statistically significant studies, these have not been proven to cause zits, but there are always exceptions. "If you break out when you eat chocolate, don't eat chocolate." Same with dairy, which again, has been shown in some cases to have an effect but no concrete cause-and-effect relationship exists.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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